[Click to enlarge]
Off McGlathery I.
Click
Javelin 2009 Maine Cruise
August 3 - 21, 2009

For the tenth time, Steve Blecher's 53' J-160, Javelin takes a tried and true, mostly Dartmouth grad, crew on a cruise to Maine. Steve (Dartmouth '64), Rick Van Mell ('63), Mel Converse ('60), & Paul Wharton (Duke '64) boarding at Westbrook, CT made up this year's crew. Usual crew Brian Klinger ('62) was scheduled to be aboard, but hernia repair surgery kept him dockside in Portsmouth, NH (Wentworth Marina) where we planned to meet up with him on August 16. The Plan was to work quickly east, traversing Long Island Sound, Narraganset Bay, Buzzards Bay, through the Cape Cod Canal and eventually touching Canadian waters, then working back west in easy steps. Usual planned stops included Harpswell Sound to see Leighton & Karin McIlvaine, then south through the Cape Cod Canal for a visit with Jay ('64) and Hasty Evans at Scraggy Neck before poking into Stonington, CT, then returning to Westbrook.

That was The Plan, but you'll just have to read on to see what happened when the wind hit the plan! Pictures by Mel Converse and Rick Van Mell are grouped between days. There may even be a few movie clips too. The table below summarizes daily runs and the date is a link to that day's log.


Log Summary


Elapsed Track Avg.
Date From To Depart Arrive DD:HH:MM Miles Speed
Mon 8/3 Westbrook (at sea) 5:28 n/a      
Tues 8/4 (at Sea) McGlathery n/a 16:11 1:10:43 264 7.6
Wed 8/5 McGlathery NE Harbor 8:58 13:06 4:08 28 6.8
Thur 8/6 NE Harbor Cross Island 8:35 17:33 8:58 67 7.5
Fri 8/7 Cross Island Mistake I. 8:50 15:25 6:35 42 6.4
Sat 8/8 Mistake I. Stave I. Hbr. 9:30 17:31 8:01 53 6.6
Sun 8/9 Stave I. Hbr NE Harbor 9:30 16:15 6:45 41 6.1
Mon 8/10 NE Harbor NE Harbor 11:45 15:40 3:55 21 5.4
Tues 8/11 NE Harbor Bucks Harbor 7:40 16:37 8:57 61 6.8
Wed 8/12 Bucks Harbor Long Cove 8:15 16:21 8:06 56 6.9
Thur 8/13 Long Cove Five Islands 8:17 15:50 7:33 48 6.4
Fri 8/14Five Islands Sebasco 8:20 16:05 7:45 57 7.4
Sat 8/15 Sebasco Harpswell 8:05 14:54 6:49 44 6.5
Sun 8/16 Harpswell Wentworth 5:52 12:48 6:56 56 8.1
Mon 8/17 Special K Day (includes lunch) 11:00 16:00 5:00 26 5.2
Tue 8/18 Wentworth Scituate 6:35 16:45 10:10 70 6.9
Wed 8/19 Scituate Scraggy Neck 6:03 19:20 11:19 88 7.8
Thur 8/20 Scraggy  Stonington 5:34 14:10 8:36 65 7.6
Fri 8/21 Stonington Westbrook 6:35 9:46 3:11 28 8.8
Totals: 6:13:27 1115 7.1


Sunday, August 2nd

Breakfast rain on the patio at Steve & Amy's Scarsdale home cast grave doubt on the chances of going for a Sunday day-sail with Paul Wharton aboard his Solitude before departing for Maine. The night before Rick had arrived from California, and Mel from Washington, DC. So instead of Plan A, it was on to Plan B: Steve & Rick settled in with the Sunday New York Times, and Mel joined them a little after 0800.

As they read, Amy joined them and was passing along the calorie and carbohydrate counts for various foods - Steve was going on a low-carb, reduced calorie regimen. If it wasn't the count that was disturbing, the portion size seemed just about right - if you were a Lilliputian!

At mid-morning there was a break in the rain, so Rick, Steve and Mel headed for the A&P to stock up on the last load of food for the cruise. With Amy's counts still rattling in their ears, perennial favorites were struck from Rick's 4-page shopping list. Gone was the bed-rock starter Entenmans Danish Raspberry Twist. Ditto the chocolate chip cookies. The Oreos, however, survived the cut, but still reduced in numbers.

We returned to Scarsdale a little after noon, just as the rain started again in earnest. This time accompanied by thunder, it poured for about half an hour and finally gave way to sunshine when Paul and Elinor arrived for dinner at 5 pm. Steve grilled burgers outside and all hands enjoyed talking about the adventures ahead. While "the boys" headed for Maine, Amy & a friend were headed to the canals of Europe.

Steve was agitating to get under way, and by 7 pm we were loading food and duffel bags into the SUV. We headed off to Westbrook, Connecticut, about 87 miles away, and Javelin. The last of the gear and food went aboard as the last light faded from the sky. While Rick stowed the food, Paul filled the water tanks. All hands made up their bunks, and Rick & Steve entered waypoints into the ship's GPS for the route to McGlathery Island in Maine. It's about 100 miles to the Cape Cod Canal, 8 more through it, and 164 more on to McGlathery. By 2230 all was stowed and the crew turned in for a good, but short, night's sleep.

[Click to enlarge]
Relaxed Sunday ...
[Click to enlarge]
watching a game ...
[Click to enlarge]
until Amy reads ...
[Click to enlarge]
the calories & carbs list!
[Click to enlarge]
Aboard Sunday night ...
[Click to enlarge]
nav station ready ...
[Click to enlarge]
cabins aft as ...
[Click to enlarge]
Mel checks email ...
[Click to enlarge]
Rick's bunk is ready ...
[Click to enlarge]
Javelin in her slip.


Monday, August 3rd

Steve and Mel were making noises by 0445; Rick & Paul upright five minutes later. Mel had the coffee perking, Rick got short glasses of orange juice and bowls of instant oatmeal with bananas ready to go. LIke a team who has done this many times before, Javelin was getting ready to depart. The canvass cover came off the binnacle and steering wheel. Steve turned on the navigation electronics and companion computer. Paul disconnected and stowed the shore power cable; Rick took the covers off the cockpit instruments and activated the route on the computer.

All this and eating breakfast too was complete at 0528 as we cast off the dock lines and headed for Maine. The blue-black sky of morning was quickly getting lighter. Without a breath of wind, a few ducks and geese paddled along the shore. The last buoy blinked its light as we headed out the Westbrook channel into Long Island Sound and turned east. Bright yellow-orange streaks through a low cloud bank announced the rising of the sun.

Now at cruising speed of 8 knots through the water and under control of the autopilot, Javelin gracefully followed the route east past Long Sand Shoal, on to Bartlett Reef and across to Fishers Island Sound. Patches of fog came and went, with the radar going on when visibility was reduced, though we could always see the sun's disk. While we saw several boats that had given Securite calls, we never did see the navel vessel being escorted out of New London for which there was a 500 yard exclusion zone. Most likely because it was a submarine!

Fog cleared as we reached Watch Hill, the end of Fishers Island Sound and the beginning of Rhode Island. Toward the end of the 15 mile passage to Point Judith, we passed the New York Yacht Club cruise heading west. Though it looked like they would have liked to have sailed or raced, the light wind had most boat under power. Sure was a great collection of mega-yachts, super-feast, and classic boats. Lots of pictures.

The wind slowly increased from astern going into Buzzards Bay - rather typical for a summer afternoon. We added a half knot by rolling out the jib, but powered on as we marched toward the Cape Cod Canal on our push to get to Maine. We passed Cleveland Ledge light and entered the canal at 1715, and were swept through the 8 mile canal with the current making up to 12 knots over the bottom. By 1755 we were tied to the fuel dock at the end of the canal, and by 1800 headed out into Cap Cod Bay on the north side of Cape Cod for the 164 mile run to our destination - McGlathery Island in Maine.

Our dinner efforts were at first stymied by a recalcitrant oven that refused to stay lit. As a safety feature, when the propane stove is lit, you have to push in, turn, and hold the knob to light each burner, then hold it until a thermocouple confirms that there is a flame. If the thermocouple doesn't sense enough heat, it shuts off the gas when you release the knob - this to prevent unburned gas from collecting and then exploding. Though Rick held the knob for minutes at a time, the flame went out when it was let go. A lime solved the problem - by wedging it between the knob and the protection bar to keep the knob pushed in. Eventually Paul's home made lasagna, with salad, made for a great dinner.

It was a delightful evening as we powered toward the "hook" of Cape Cod. The air was warm, a light breeze filled in from the southeast and all was well as the sun set and the moon rose.

[Click to enlarge]
Mel serves up ...
[Click to enlarge]
0500 coffee.
[Click to enlarge]
No wind.
[Click to enlarge]
Oatmeal finished.
[Click to enlarge]
First light.
[Click to enlarge]
Ready to go.
[Click to enlarge]
Under way ...
[Click to enlarge]
stowing lines ...
[Click to enlarge]
heading out ...
[Click to enlarge]
morning flock ...
[Click to enlarge]
channel ahead ...
[Click to enlarge]
last buoy.
[Click to enlarge]
Cruising speed ...
[Click to enlarge]
on our way ...
[Click to enlarge]
dawn.
[Click to enlarge]
Paul on watch ...
[Click to enlarge]
Steve does chores.
[Click to enlarge]
Against the fog ...
[Click to enlarge]
Old Saybrook Light.
[Click to enlarge]
Fishers I. in fog ...
[Click to enlarge]
shows extra returns!
[Click to enlarge]
Eastbound cruiser.
[Click to enlarge]
Watch Hill, RI ...
[Click to enlarge]
up close.
[Click to enlarge]
NY Yacht Club cruise ...
[Click to enlarge]
heads west ...
[Click to enlarge]
many mega-yachts ...
[Click to enlarge]
from new sleds & ...
[Click to enlarge]
maxis like ...
[Click to enlarge]
Rambler ...
[Click to enlarge]
light wind ...
[Click to enlarge]
some classics too ...
[Click to enlarge]
thie beauty dwarfs ...
[Click to enlarge]
a NY 42 footer ...
[Click to enlarge]
picture perfect!
[Click to enlarge]
OK, move on.
[Click to enlarge]
Point Judith astern.
[Click to enlarge]
Jib set in Buzzards Bay
[Click to enlarge]
Paul's on watch ...
[Click to enlarge]
making 8.9 knots.
[Click to enlarge]
Pretty company
[Click to enlarge]
By the numbers.
[Click to enlarge]
Cleveland Ledge light ...
[Click to enlarge]
up close & personal.
[Click to enlarge]
Wing Neck is ...
[Click to enlarge]
Cape Cod Cananl control
[Click to enlarge]
RR Bridge towers ...
[Click to enlarge]
Highway bridge ...
[Click to enlarge]
lazy cormorants!
[Click to enlarge]
Canal based ...
[Click to enlarge]
mechant training ship.
[Click to enlarge]
In we go
[Click to enlarge]
Current is with us.
[Click to enlarge]
Lime on duty.
[Click to enlarge]
Stopping for fuel.
[Click to enlarge]
Chelsea Girl gets ...
[Click to enlarge]
lots of birds.
[Click to enlarge]
Paul says it's done ...
[Click to enlarge]
good dinner.
[Click to enlarge]
Into Cape Cod Bay.
[Click to enlarge]
Sun lingers ...
[Click to enlarge]
into clouds ...
[Click to enlarge]
and sets.
[Click to enlarge]
Moon rising ...
[Click to enlarge]
in the east.


Go To Log Summary

Tuesday, August 4th

Almost couldn't have been better. The "graveyard watch", from midnight to 4 am, when it's nice, is one of those special times most of us don't get to see on a regular basis. Celestial bodies populate your vision. When you are approaching 50 miles from land in any direction, you are truly the spec in the universe. This night an almost full moon, low to the south, washed a soft light across an undulating sea. The horizon was visible in a full circle, and scattered, gentle, cumulus clouds drifted past the moon from time to time leaving moonbeams playing between them.

The sky cleared about mid-watch, and as the moon's light faded to orange in the southwest, more and more familiar stars could be seen. Directly above the masthead was Cassieopeia, toward the west was Cygnus the Swan, also called the Northern Cross, slowly relinquishing her summer dominance. Across the dim pole star, only the handle of the big Dipper dimly materialized low on the northern horizon. As a reminder of the relentless approach of the autumnal equinox, faint Peadies, followed by majestic Orion climbed above the eastern haze.

Maybe it could have been perfect if the engine were off and we were making the same great speed under sail, but we had miles to go, and promises to keep.

Unfortunately the 0400 to 0800 watch got fog rather than a nice sunrise. The dew was heavy and the cushions wet - good weather to stand watch in at least foul weather gear bottoms. But it was still relatively warm, the sea rolling gently, and the miles ticked away. It was 119 miles from the tip of Cape Cod to our waypoint at Matinicus Rock, and one by one the right-hand instrument numbers clicked down each tenth of a mile until we arrived at 1056 - in fog.

Now were were back in the land of lobster pots and lobster boats. Close watch on the radar and the computer screen helped sort out which radar returns were the expected islands and buoys, and which had no analog on the charts and were probably other boats. With radio, good ears and judicious periods of slow speed we threaded our way up between Vinalhaven and Isle Au Haut islands. Threading our way past the specks of Ragged, Wooden Ball, Brimstone & Sparrow Islands, and Scrag & Halibut Ledges. Not to mention just plain rocks. The closer we got, the more boats we found, including one wooden, calssic, NY 20 that ghosted bast without a radar trace. Slow speed was the rule.

Within a mile of our target cove, the fog started to clear. Still plenty slow threading through the lobster pots and a narrow passage into the spot between McGlathery and Round Islands. Two boats were already there, but Steve spun Javelin right between them and we settled back on the anchor. The larget of the two boats set up their awnings for shade and a hammock for sun -- it looked like we would have both here.

Paul set to work blowing up Javelin's rubber dinghy so we could go exploring ourselves. He set out in the dinghy to explore the beach - but called with a warning that we were being attached by Pirates!

Hank Jonas, of On Rush fame, is due to meet us soon -- our radio contacts have been weak, and cell phone signals are in the just-barely range. It was about 4:30 when Hank arrived and anchored close by. After a second look, Hank decided to move farther from the rocks and out into the bay a bit.

That accomplished, he came aboard and we all went below to catch up. A few nibbles were consumed before Steve and Paul cooked the steaks on the grill to go with Rick's salad. The movie for the evening was "A History of Viloence" - neither Mel nor Rick stayed awake for the ending.

[Click to enlarge]
Passing Cape Cod hook.
[Click to enlarge]
40+ miles from land.
[Click to enlarge]
Breakfast cereal.
[Click to enlarge]
Metinicus Rk in fog ...
[Click to enlarge]
shows company.
[Click to enlarge]
Under control ...
[Click to enlarge]
with radar watch ...
[Click to enlarge]
still.
[Click to enlarge]
Paul's turn.DSC01350
[Click to enlarge]
foggy pass.
[Click to enlarge]
Breaking up.
[Click to enlarge]
Round Island
[Click to enlarge]
Where we're going.
[Click to enlarge]
Easy does it ...
[Click to enlarge]
end in sight ...
[Click to enlarge]
others too.
[Click to enlarge]
Tight squeeze.
[Click to enlarge]
Ready for shade ...
[Click to enlarge]
and sun.
[Click to enlarge]
Nice beach.
[Click to enlarge]
Paul rowed ashore ...
[Click to enlarge]
scouted for trouble ...
[Click to enlarge]
"Avast, there be pirates!"
[Click to enlarge]
Prepare to board!
[Click to enlarge]
Key items are ...
[Click to enlarge]
Hank Jonas & ...
[Click to enlarge]
On Rush.
[Click to enlarge]
Nice anchorage ...
[Click to enlarge]
settled in ...
[Click to enlarge]
now dinner time ...
[Click to enlarge]
Rick carves ...
[Click to enlarge]
Paul's hungry ...
[Click to enlarge]
Cheers!
[Click to enlarge]
All done.


Go To Log Summary

Wednesday, August 5th

Wedensday dawned with a nice breeze and a fringe of fog beyond McGlathery Island. After a quick eggs and sausage breakfast (no biscuits this year), we hauled the anchor at 0858 and explored a couple of close-by nooks and cranies for another year, then set sail at 1016 for a run to Northeast Harbor.

With a southwest wind in the 12 - 14 knot range, Javelin charged along at 9 knots. Hank took some pictures from On Rush, which are added below. It's the first time we've had a pciture of the whole crew aboard under sail.

The breeze increased, but so did the fog. With our course almost dead down wind, we changed plans and headed southeast below Swans Island, planning to tack down wind in the open waters beyond.

Back to navigation by radar and computer, we picked our way between Swan and Long Islands, but the wind kept going dead astern, so we kept changing course to keep up our speed. Finally, about 2 miles outside Western Way, the entrance to southwest and Northeast Harbors, we dropped the main, rolled up the jib and powered our way on in. Lunch sandwiches were eaten while dodging half a dozen boats before we broke out of the fog jut inside the Western Way entrance.

Lots of boats were sailing around, including the beautiful 125' Rebecca, which we captured on camera. We stropped for fuel at Clifton Dock, and it happened that Bob Johnstone, one of the owners of J Boats and a friend of Steve's, is renting a house right behind the dock. Bob saw Javelin and came aboard. He tried to talk Steve into sticking around for the Down East Race Week - Friday, Saturday and Sunday. At this writing we still haven't decided to stay, or head east as planned.

We found our slip at the Northeast Harbor docks and started our chores. Log writing, boat scrubbing and a shopping run were definites, with a possible laundry run too. As Steve and Paul did most of the scrubbing, across the dock a gal was doing the same on a pair of Hinkley Picnic Boats, a big and original size, with glistening varnish. Before long all the boats looked great.

Rick got the first 125 pictures of the log uploaded for friends and family to track us. Hank came aboard with a plate of celery dressed with can-squeezed Kraft Easy Cheese. He says he's going to write a book on how to use Easy Cheese and make a fortune. We didn't even have cocktail hour, we headed for the Docksider and a lobster dinner.

A few tables were open when we got there, but they were quickly filled with an overflow crowd waiting. By chance, right next to us, with the tables just touching, Bob Johnstone and his family sat down. It was one long extended table of 10 with sea stories and fun for the dinner. The lobsters were some of the best we had ever had. Some of us even had the traditional blueberry pie al a mode for dessert.

It was bunk time between 2100 and 2200 - no movie.

[Click to enlarge]
Morning On Rush
[Click to enlarge]
Hauling anchor ...
[Click to enlarge]
under way.
[Click to enlarge]
She swims!
[Click to enlarge]
Heading east ...
[Click to enlarge]
Steve at the helm ...
[Click to enlarge]
happy crew.
[Click to enlarge]
Who moved it?
[Click to enlarge]
Good sailing makes ...
[Click to enlarge]
Steve happy.
[Click to enlarge]
Working for lobster
[Click to enlarge]
Working for passengers.
[Click to enlarge]
SW Hbr & Somes hills.
[Click to enlarge]
Nice schooner ...
[Click to enlarge]
Here comes ...
[Click to enlarge]
mighty Rebecca ...
[Click to enlarge]
bone in her teeth ...
[Click to enlarge]
ship shape &
bristol fashion
[Click to enlarge]
Little schooner ...
[Click to enlarge]
little sailor ...
[Click to enlarge]
happy people ...
[Click to enlarge]
big boat!
[Click to enlarge]
Bob Johnstone asks Steve
to go racing.
[Click to enlarge]
Cleaning crew ...
[Click to enlarge]
ditto next door ...
[Click to enlarge]
getting cleaned ...
[Click to enlarge]
final rinse ....
[Click to enlarge]
looking great.
[Click to enlarge]
ditto next door.


Go To Log Summary

Thursday, August 6th

Even at 0700 the sun was warm on rick's back as he walked up Sea Street headed for The Pine Tree Market. Crisp blue skies, deep green trees and the making for a great day of sailing beckoned as soon as fresh food was added to the galley stores. Steve made a trip to the hardware store - just as it opened at 0800 - to get engine oil. With everything stowed, and one last chat with Hank Jonas on the dock, we were under way by 0922.

Ten knots of northwest breeze ruffled eastern way, then a clam spot before Lewis Rock, and finally sails set at the lower end of Frenchman Bay. Frenchman Bay forms the east side of Mt. Desert Island, which itself is mostly Acadia National Park, with Cadillac Mountain as it's top, and the beautiful Somes Sound one of it's sparkling jewels. Leaving it all astern, we headed east, close hauled on port tack into the northwest wind. As we passed the end of Frenchman Bay, at Schoodic Point, the wind backed to the west and went light. Down came the main and jib, on went the engine.

When we left the dock our destination was vaguely defined as "down east". To Steve that means the end of the United States and the beginning of Canada. Geographically that has the Maine coast terminating at Eastport, forming a broad funnel with Canadian Grand Manan Island for the last 13 miles. Ten miles southwest of the tip of Grand Manan Island is Machias Seal Island - claimed by the Unites States, but Canada runs the lighthouse and support buildings on the island.

To quote Taft's Cruising guide to the Maine Coast, "...Both the United States and Canada claim it as theirs, and they have disputed it for more than a century and a half. It is hard to imagine why the sovereignty of this scrap of land is in contention, but it is, and the outcome probably will be decided at the International Court of Justice in The Hague several thousand miles to the east. If it was simply a question of which flag should fly at the lighthouse, it would be fairly ludicrous, but nowadays, with the 200-mile limit and fishing rights at stake, the issues are more serious."

It is a breeding ground for puffins and razorbill, petrels, and arctic and common terns. It's been on our target list for at least three years - thwarted by fog, including one trip that got within a quarter mile of it and never saw it. As the wind backed to the southwest, we set the spinnaker on starboard tack and roared off toward Machias Seal Island doing 9 knots.

Forty miles later, there it stood sharp and crisp on a sparkling sea. As we approached, the wind lightened and a high thin stratus started to move in from the south. We dropped all sail and powered around the island - fighting a least a two knot current headed north amid numerous swirls and eddies along the way. Look at the chart picture and you will see depths jumping from over 400 feet to 12 feet and back to 200 feet. Just try to picture the sea floor as a very funny looking mountain range if there were no water.

Pictures galore recorded the island and the birds - though most had flown north by this time. There were some seals too, and an accidental capture of a mirage of the radio towers at Cutler Naval Base, ten miles to the west. Having finally accomplished this visit, we turned west to the familiar anchorage on the northeast side of Cross Island - directly east of the field of radio towers.

The anchor went down at 1733, and by 1800 the riding sail was set, a few more pictures taken, and we retired below. A brief cocktail hour proceeded Steve & Paul grilling pork chops and Rick served up fresh-made Cole slaw and apple sauce with horseradish. No dessert. The movie was "Swordfish" with John Travolta, Hugh Jackman and Halle Berry. Lights out by 2200.

[Click to enlarge]
Thursday morning ...
[Click to enlarge]
where's the wind?
[Click to enlarge]
Cadillac Mountain
Acadia Ntl. Park
[Click to enlarge]
Paul approves
[Click to enlarge]
Under sail ...
[Click to enlarge]
northwest breeze ...
[Click to enlarge]
nice speed ...
[Click to enlarge]
nice trim.
[Click to enlarge]
Southwest wind ...
[Click to enlarge]
makes Steve happy ...
[Click to enlarge]
Paul too, ...
[Click to enlarge]
ditto Mel.
[Click to enlarge]
Spinnaker flying ...
[Click to enlarge]
Our 3-year destination ...
[Click to enlarge]
dead ahead ...
[Click to enlarge]
Rick clicks ...
[Click to enlarge]
Machias Seal Island ...
[Click to enlarge]
structures ...
[Click to enlarge]
back side ...
[Click to enlarge]
west side ...
[Click to enlarge]
lighthouse ...
[Click to enlarge]
bird blinds ...
[Click to enlarge]
east side ...
[Click to enlarge]
warning sign,
"Debarcadere Dangereux"
[Click to enlarge]
Cutler towers mirage!
[Click to enlarge]
razorbills ...
[Click to enlarge]
seals ...
[Click to enlarge]
nesting area ...
[Click to enlarge]
plenty of gulls ...
[Click to enlarge]
puffins ...
[Click to enlarge]
yes, pots too ...
[Click to enlarge]
razorbills that ...
[Click to enlarge]
disappear!
[Click to enlarge]
farewell, Seal Island
[Click to enlarge]
Bulk carrier.
[Click to enlarge]
Cutler's radio towers
[Click to enlarge]
Beautiful Maine
[Click to enlarge]
Old Man Island
[Click to enlarge]
Approaching anchorage ...
[Click to enlarge]
looking for ...
[Click to enlarge]
# 5 ....
[Click to enlarge]
towers astern ...
[Click to enlarge]
our spot ahead.
[Click to enlarge]
Anchor going down.
[Click to enlarge]
Riding sail set.
[Click to enlarge]
Cutler's towers.
[Click to enlarge]
Canadian cruiser ...
[Click to enlarge]
the vikings? Nope, ...
[Click to enlarge]
Outward Bound boat.
[Click to enlarge]
Cheers!
[Click to enlarge]
Sunset trees.
[Click to enlarge]
Full moon
[Click to enlarge]
Night towers.


Go To Log Summary

Friday, August 7th

Another beautiful morning. With little wind and no pressing destination the crew was offered choices for breakfast - with French Toast the winner. With Little Smokies on the side, they were consumed with little fanfare.

Under way at 0850, and still no wind, we motored across Machias Bay into Buck's Harbor, headed for the Eastern Atlantic Lobster Company dock. We pulled in, made Javelin secure to the rough working dock, and walked the long, bouncing, aluminum gangway up to the office. Four 1.5 lb soft-shell lobsters ("shedders") were soon in a bag headed for out fridge and a dinner date with the crew. The company was bought by a Boston outfit and is now the BBS Lobster company. Their only sales pamphlet is for http://www.lobsterlogistics.com, which offers to, "...Use Specially Designed Shipping Containers To Separate Your Lobsters, Which Keeps Them From Hurting OneAnother On Their Journey To Your Dinner Table." Toll free line: 877-234-7850.

0950 and still no wind, so we powered west out of Machias Bay, through pictueresque Foster channel, and headed for Shorey Cove, on the north side of Roque Island, for lunch.

Sparkles on the water. Wind at 5.5, north of west, but building - 6 knots; 7 knots; 8 knots. 1105 and there's a change in plans. Steve asks, "Do you need to be at anchor to make lunch?" "No," comes the reply. Hoist the main! Set the jib! Steve's ready to SAIL! 1125: wind north of west at 4.4, speed over ground 2.7 knots, with .8 knots of current, for boat speed of 1.9 knots - and decreasing. 1132: wind instrument says 206 degrees at 3.0 knots -- boat speed is 4.8 knots - go figure! Wind is shifting more southwest, stronger at the surface than 75' up at the masthead. 1134: instrument = 4.6 knots; boat speed = 5.0 knots. Just like a racing day, squeezing out all the speed we can. 11:40: instrument = 8.9 knots; boat speed = 6.9. 11:49: instrument = 8.5 knots; boat speed = 7.9. We're headed back out to sea on a course of 150 degrees, passing The Brothers.

A beautiful afternoon of sailing. Out to sea about 10 miles, then tacked for Moose Peak Light and Mistake Harbor. Winds were in 12 - 14 knot range for most of the time, and Javelin sailed along close hauled at 8.5 to 8.7 knots. As we closed with Moose Peak, a dry line squall with a cloud line blew through, shifting the wind almost 90 degrees to the northwest and increasing to about 22 knots. We put in a first reef, then quickly added a second reef in the main. We contin ued our drive to the north, then tacked to the west about 2 miles offshore. As we were dead to leeward of Moose Peak, we furled the jib, dropped the main and powered into the channel.

To our pleasant surprise, there was only one boat trying to anchor in all of Mistake, and we picked a good spot and set the anchor neatly on the first try. Steve & Rick set the riding sail over the cockpit by the time Paul & Mel had put the chafing gear on the anchor line and retired aft.

Paul launched the rubber dinghy and rowed to shore. A hike through the wood along a trail and boardwalk brought him to the lighthouse on the point. Spectacular views and a deep blue sea are obvious from the pictures. Paul retreated to the old Coast Guard shed and radioed that he was there. Rick tried several pictures from Javelin - one quarter mile away. We were all amazed at the results! It was a good row upwind, and then it was dinner time.

The bag-o-lobsters found its way from the fridge to the pot, with some green peas and rice, it was all ready in about half an hour. Pictures show the gleaming, steaming, bright red results. All agreed these shedders were excellent - Paul going so far as to say they exceeded even the top ranked Docksider delights from Wednesday night. Once again, no dessert.

Sam Elliott, Kate Capshaw and Tom conti starred in this evening's feature, "The Quick and the Dead." This was followed by another attempt at moon pictures, with a cool, 15 knot northwesterly whistling through the rigging. Moonlight playing on waves invited a lingering look, but the chill in the air soon brought all below. 2200 was only shortly past as all heads hit their bunks.

[Click to enlarge]
Friday morning ...
[Click to enlarge]
cruiser sits ...
[Click to enlarge]
anchor up ...
[Click to enlarge]
Mink tail.
[Click to enlarge]
At Eastern Atlantic
Lobster Company
[Click to enlarge]
Bag-o-lobsters
[Click to enlarge]
A source!
[Click to enlarge]
Libby Island
[Click to enlarge]
Stone Island
[Click to enlarge]
Foster Channel ...
[Click to enlarge]
looks like this.
[Click to enlarge]
Ram & Scabby Islands
[Click to enlarge]
Mel's happy
[Click to enlarge]
Entering Moose
Peak Channel
[Click to enlarge]
Light astern ...
[Click to enlarge]
rocky banks have ...
[Click to enlarge]
great texture ...
[Click to enlarge]
wind-stunted trees.
[Click to enlarge]
Paul rowed ashore ...
[Click to enlarge]
Javelin's way out ...
[Click to enlarge]
boardwalk leads ...
[Click to enlarge]
to the point ...
[Click to enlarge]
there she be ...
[Click to enlarge]
entrance channel ...
[Click to enlarge]
rocky coast ...
[Click to enlarge]
old foundation ...
[Click to enlarge]
great light ...
[Click to enlarge]
fog signal ...
[Click to enlarge]
magnificant view ...
[Click to enlarge]
and shore ...
[Click to enlarge]
wind-beaten ...
[Click to enlarge]
old shed ...
[Click to enlarge]
our hero!
[Click to enlarge]
We hear you ...
[Click to enlarge]
well done!
[Click to enlarge]
Come on back.
[Click to enlarge]
First in the pot ...
[Click to enlarge]
next in line ...
[Click to enlarge]
coming out ...
[Click to enlarge]
fit for a king ...
[Click to enlarge]
you said it!
[Click to enlarge]
Mistake last light ...
[Click to enlarge]
quiet sea ...
[Click to enlarge]
almost gone ...
[Click to enlarge]
Amen.


Go To Log Summary

Saturday, August 8th

Bright and clear, Saturday morning blew in. Still from the northwest at 10 - 12 knots, the wind held Javelin steady on her anchor. The riding sail was doing its job well with very little swinging, all of which made for a sound night's sleep. The only tough decision was which of the remaining three choices to have for breakfast: eggs, cereal, or oatmeal. Since we had no particular destination to reach today, the eggs won out, saving the quicker choices for Sunday, and our desired early start back to Northeast Harbor on Monday for a day of replenishment.

Sometime during the night an Outward Bound training cutter sailed or rowed into the little inlet where Paul had gone ashore yesterday. They were still under their cover, if not asleep, when we hauled anchor at 0930.

One of Hank Jonas' favorite anchorages in this area is Mud Hole on Great Wass Island. It's an almost completely land-locked pool with 16 feet depth is accessible only through an entrance with 2 feet of water at low tide. Just outside the entrance is a semi-protected shelf, and farther north a possible anchorage off Sand Cove. We threaded Javelin through the rocks, ledges and little islands of Eastern Bay to go have a closer look.

As we made an approach to Sand Cove, we were blocked by floating fish farms. They didn't appear on the chart on the ship's navigation computer, but did show on Paul's new Garmin 478 chart plotter which he had on deck. Turning left, we slid slowly through another narrow slot to the entrance to Mud Hole. A trim white cutter flying the Cruising Club of America burgee at her masthead was anchored on the shelf at the entrance. In the morning sun, the couple appeared to be applying a fresh coat of varnish to their brightwork. As we watched, a mast appeared over the rocks, followed eventually by a black hull. This sloop looked to be about 40', with a likely draft in the 6' range, if it wasn't a centerboarder. The tide program showed a current tide height of 6.7 feet, or, in theory, 8.7 feet of water for it to get over the bar. It came out slowly and carefully. High tide here is usually about 12 - 13', in theory Javelin could take her 7' draft inside -- not high on Steve's adventure list.

Leaving Moose Peak astern, we hoisted sail and started beating into the 9-10 knot southwest breeze. This is what we came for. It was one of those delightful days to be on the water. Javelin was in her element, powerfully slicing through the dark blue water, white foam splashing and hissing as it slid quickly astern. The wind oscillated between 275 and 285 degrees - about west-northwest, and boat speed ranged from 7.5 to 8.5 knots. The column of air was not uniform rising from the surface, a combination of natural friction and the temperature differences of the air coming off the land and the water.

We all took about an hour of helm time, and as we worked west a pattern appeared. On port tack, heading north-northwest toward land, we would be headed as the wind veered more to the northwest. Then we'd tack and head just south of west until, as we got farther from land, the wind would back to the southwest, and we would be forced farther out to sea. The wind was stronger here, and more fun to sail. Steve was betting that it would become even stronger and more southerly as the day went on - a typical pattern. But the pattern remained steady most of the day - lighter winds toward shore forcing us north rather than west, and stronger winds offshore forcing us south.

Around 1330, about 11 miles southeast of Petit Manan Light, we spotted a series of whale spouts astern. They were about half a mile away and continued for about twenty minutes. In the sunshine we sailed past the longitude of Trafton Island, a possible destination for the night, and just kept going.

By 1530 we were seven miles out to sea below Schoodic point, some 25 miles from the next target anchorage in Flanders Bay. We tacked on to port and cracked sheets slightly for a romping ride into Frenchman Bay and on to Flanders. But the wind again shifted northwest and went lighter. In came the jib, on went the engine and we power sailed in past Winter Harbor. Time to take the main down too, just as a pair of dolphins loped past.

We slipped through the narrow slots between the islands headed for Flanders, but then stuck our nose into the large and open cove of Stave Island Harbor and found a broad 10' shelf to our liking. Anchor down at 1731. Spaghetti & meatballs, green salad, and Kirk Douglas' "Paths of Glory" finished off the evening.

[Click to enlarge]
Outward Bound!
[Click to enlarge]
Anchor detail
[Click to enlarge]
Bright morning
[Click to enlarge]
This house ...
[Click to enlarge]
is perched ...
[Click to enlarge]
on a small island.
[Click to enlarge]
Fish farms
[Click to enlarge]
Rock bound?
[Click to enlarge]
Not really ...
[Click to enlarge]
good day for ...
[Click to enlarge]
doing brightwork.
[Click to enlarge]
Tight exit from ...
[Click to enlarge]
Mud Hole.
[Click to enlarge]
Looks better from here.
[Click to enlarge]
Brain trust
[Click to enlarge]
Leaving Moose Peak
[Click to enlarge]
Rick's happy
[Click to enlarge]
Weather watch
[Click to enlarge]
Fine house
[Click to enlarge]
Pulpit ledge is ...
[Click to enlarge]
mighty tight ...
[Click to enlarge]
birds don't care.
[Click to enlarge]
Entering Stave Hbr.
[Click to enlarge]
Local fleet ...
[Click to enlarge]
visiting fleet & ...
[Click to enlarge]
shore party.
[Click to enlarge]
Starship Enterprise
[Click to enlarge]
Cozy spot
[Click to enlarge]
Movie screen ...
[Click to enlarge]
movie, and ...
[Click to enlarge]
audience ...
[Click to enlarge]
with Rick.


Go To Log Summary

Sunday, August 9th

We know that Sunday is a Day Of Rest, but this is ridiculous. Here it is almost 0900, and the wind instrument still shows 0.0 knots. Sitting perfectly still in Stave Island harbor, not even a current seems to be running, and the lobster pots are equally motionless. Patches of stratus drift across the sun giving alternating bright and muted light. The forecast is for southwest winds, 5 - 10, increasing to 10-15 with gusts to 20 this afternoon, and showers and thunderstorms after midnight. We're contemplating returning to Northeast Harbor a day early so we don't have to fill fuel tanks, and haul provisions and laundry between the boat and the Pine Tree Market in tomorrow's rain. That is, if our request for dock space can be accommodated.

By 0930 we figured we could tease the wind into blowing by going exploring. At the north end of Frenchman Bay there is an island-studded bay called Sullivan's Harbor. Neither Steve, in all his previous years, nor Javelin had ever explored this spot. With Rick calling courses, and Paul & Steve following along with hand held GPS units up on deck, we worked our way into Sullivan's Harbor. Lots of lobster pots, but also several areas that would make for a great lunch stop or even an overnight anchorage. At the head of the bay there is a very narrow passage into a small pool beyond. The passage is studded with an exposed rock and an underwater shelf which together block about 85% of the opening. We were heading for the remaining 15% when Steve spots the tide rip at the far left side of the passage -- Javelin spun and that as far as we went. The cruising guide calls it a "reversing falls" (there's about 10' of tide here).

Our ploy seemed to work as there was now about 7 knots of breeze. Back into Frenchman Bay we hoisted sail and beat south past Bar Harbor and Egg Rock to the open ocean. Turning west, we crossed in front of Northeast Harbor, and sailed on into Somes Sound - the only fjord in North America. Finally, retracing our steps, and finding those puffs in the 15 knot plus range, we roared back to Northeast Harbor for the night.

With that predicted rain, we wanted to get some chores done early. Rick made a major provisioning run to the Pine Tree Market, and also got the log uploaded. These were accomplished by 1830.Hank and his friend Rebecca joined us for the second of Paul's great lasagnas, accompanied by green beans, and finished off with a combination of the peach pie Hank & Rebecca brought topped with fried rum bananas, blueberries and whipped cream. It was so satisfying that Steve found a couple of the old DCYC song books and we did our best to sing them all before calling it quits.

[Click to enlarge]
Sitting on Rocks
[Click to enlarge]
No wind.
[Click to enlarge]
Back afloat
[Click to enlarge]
Shore party
[Click to enlarge]
Sullivan Hbr inspection
[Click to enlarge]
Steve called it quits ...
[Click to enlarge]
at the reversing falls.
[Click to enlarge]
Leaving Sullivan Hbr
[Click to enlarge]
Headed for sea ...
[Click to enlarge]
Good driving
[Click to enlarge]
Egg Rock Light
[Click to enlarge]
Rebecca & Hank ...
[Click to enlarge]
it's happy hour ...
[Click to enlarge]
great libations ...
[Click to enlarge]
& special dessert.
[Click to enlarge]
Songfest time ...
[Click to enlarge]
was great fun.


Go To Log Summary

Monday, August 10th

No rain that we could tell overnight. It's chore day, and by 0800, having already had our oatmeal breakfast, we were all stuffing dirty clothes in the washing machines in the basement of The Pine Tree Market. Paul stayed up-street to move them to the dryers when done.

Steve & Rick started boat chores. The salt water wash down valve in the forepeak, used for hosing mud off the anchor line, leaked when the pump was turned on. Removing the bonnet revealed that the washer had disintegrated and the head of the holding screw was gone too. Also on the list was replacing the shock cord sections that tensioned the genoa track lead cars. Back up street to the hardware store got the parts, and repairs were quickly completed.

Back up-street again to get dried laundry, which Paul had almost completely folded and ready to go. One more stop at the hardware store for a new hose nozzle, and we were done with chores by 1000.

Hank & Rebecca were heading east to Lakeman Cove at Roque Island, with a nominal departure set for 1100. We waited around to see them off - and also to see if the wisps of fog blowing down the channel would clear. It cleared from view, and we took pictures as On-Rush departed. She was stopping to pick up fuel at Clifton Dock, and we headed for Javelin to go for a play-day sail.

One last round of picture taking as On-rush caught up with us after their fuel stop. They headed east, and we sailed around the Cranberry Islands and back into Great Harbor. We tried flying the spinnaker on the way in, but the wind was fitful. At one point we lowered the sock as we had wind coming alternately from both sides of the boat. The we roared along at 8 knots right toward and International One-Design fleet that was racing. A wind line stopped right in front of them and we scrambled to drop the chute and motor out of their way before causing any distress. Another circle around Greening Island into Southwest Harbor and we called it quits for the day after a total of 21 miles of sailing.

[Click to enlarge]
Monday morning call ...
[Click to enlarge]
Hi Hank
[Click to enlarge]
Hi Bear
[Click to enlarge]
Lucky guy ...
[Click to enlarge]
he knows it.
[Click to enlarge]
Casting off ...
[Click to enlarge]
heading out ...
[Click to enlarge]
flying east ...
[Click to enlarge]
coming past ...
[Click to enlarge]
hi Rebecca!
[Click to enlarge]
Picture time ...
[Click to enlarge]
and away they go.
[Click to enlarge]
On Little Cranberry
[Click to enlarge]
Lazy day sail.
[Click to enlarge]
Western Way entrance
[Click to enlarge]
Modern marvel
[Click to enlarge]
great classic


Go To Log Summary

Tuesday, August 11th

The trouble with going into town for dinner is that we are all full and ready for bed quite early. Last night we had dinner at the re-build Colonel's restaurant - it burned down last year just before we arrived. All agreed it was not a match for the Docksider.

So this morning it was simple cereal and get under way. Fog, light winds, and a potential for rain did not make for exciting news. We elected to get under way early so, if it did rain, we might be at or closer to our destination. Our target was somewhere in the Castine area of Penobscot Bay.

Skeins of fog roped the waters outside Northeast Harbor, but we had at least a half mile visibility as we went along. Turning west at #1 Western Way, we passed Bass Head Light with minimal fog, and a pair of tourists taking pictures of us. It was on to the shortcut via Ships & Barges island, then Pond Island, into the lower end of Eggemoggin Reach.

This great stretch of water to the northwest is studded with fine classic wooden boat building yards. We passed under the Eggemoggin bridge and tested the anchorage for a future stop near Herrick's Landing.

We rendezvoused with Steve's friends Dan & Nancy Padauano, and their fun boat Top Hat a bit later off of Weir Cove. They were headed for some errands, and we were headed to Castine for lobsters.

After picking up the lobsters, we sailed back and forth outside Castine as Top Hat roared up from some fishing and a mackerel catch. Though the sun was bright, off to the northwest there were building black clouds. These would be reckoned with later.

We brought aboard Dan & Nancy's sister-in-law Michelle and her great teen age boys Steve & Joseph. They were quickly put to work helping sail the boat. Whether it was just aiming for a point, steering under spinnaker, or making the boat go fast upwind, all of them did their jobs very well. Hard to tell whose smiles were greater, but Michelle was most outspoken! As skies continued to darken to the northwest, we transferred them back to Top Hat and headed for Buck's Harbor.

A battle of invitations later, we wound up at their house on Cape Rosier to steam the lobsters and enjoy their fish. All this in a fabulous barn-board house of a post-and-beam design. Every aspect was bold and efficient - the wood dumbwaiter to the second floor to supply the master bedroom fireplace is just one example. Toss in the basement greenhouse (& future brew pub), and the built-for-a-party showers in the "annex" that Steve & Joseph were enjoying.

This rain was gone, and wind too, as our crew returned to Javelin in Buck's Harbor about 2130.

[Click to enlarge]
Bass Harbor Light ...
[Click to enlarge]
with photographers.
[Click to enlarge]
Company at ...
[Click to enlarge]
Eggemoggin bridge ...
[Click to enlarge]
didn't care.
[Click to enlarge]
Herrick's landing ...
[Click to enlarge]
couldn't be sure.
[Click to enlarge]
Entering ...
[Click to enlarge]
Bucks Harbor ...
[Click to enlarge]
lots of boats ...
[Click to enlarge]
all around ...
[Click to enlarge]
the place to be is ...
[Click to enlarge]
Buck's Marine.
[Click to enlarge]
Here comes ...
[Click to enlarge]
Top Hat ...
[Click to enlarge]
looking great ...
[Click to enlarge]
can we board? ...
[Click to enlarge]
PLEASE ...
[Click to enlarge]
can I walk over? ...
[Click to enlarge]
Ok, see you soon.
[Click to enlarge]
Maine's training ship.
[Click to enlarge]
Javelin at ...
[Click to enlarge]
Castine ...
[Click to enlarge]
time for some ...
[Click to enlarge]
lobsters.
[Click to enlarge]
Company on board ...
[Click to enlarge]
Michelle, Steve & Joseph ...
[Click to enlarge]
learning to steer ...
[Click to enlarge]
foredeck training ...
[Click to enlarge]
you've got it.
[Click to enlarge]
Spinnaker's set ...
[Click to enlarge]
S & J have it dialed ...
[Click to enlarge]
Back up wind ...
[Click to enlarge]
the foredeck crew ...
[Click to enlarge]
is all smiles ...
[Click to enlarge]
The Javelin Crew
[Click to enlarge]
OK, you can drive too.
[Click to enlarge]
Nice job.
[Click to enlarge]
Now if I can only ...
[Click to enlarge]
sail it upwind ...
[Click to enlarge]
watch those telltales!
[Click to enlarge]
Flowin' hair ...
[Click to enlarge]
great concentration ...
[Click to enlarge]
makes one happy.
[Click to enlarge]
Time for rendezvous ...
[Click to enlarge]
with Dan & Nancy ...
[Click to enlarge]
crossing over ...
[Click to enlarge]
headed for shore.
[Click to enlarge]
One incredible house ...
[Click to enlarge]
living room ...
[Click to enlarge]
is expansive ...
[Click to enlarge]
massive fireplace ...
[Click to enlarge]
going upstairs ...
[Click to enlarge]
doing double duty ...
[Click to enlarge]
setting the table ...
[Click to enlarge]
charts on the walls ...
[Click to enlarge]
view from above ...
[Click to enlarge]
great overhead ...
[Click to enlarge]
& soapstone oven.
[Click to enlarge]
Lobsters & corn ...
[Click to enlarge]
Steve's at the helm ...
[Click to enlarge]
lobsters are ready ...
[Click to enlarge]
here's another ...
[Click to enlarge]
Paul's got it handled ...
[Click to enlarge]
get out the fish ...
[Click to enlarge]
halibut & mackerel.
[Click to enlarge]
View while we eat ...
[Click to enlarge]
and down to the sea ...
[Click to enlarge]
beautiful view ...
[Click to enlarge]
along the beach.
[Click to enlarge]
'Twas a perfect evening.


Go To Log Summary

Wednesday, August 12th

Fog; no wind. Eggs for breakfast; then at the fuel dock to top off diesel and water. Under way by 0840 to explore Stockton Harbor and the cove above Port Point - our original targets for last night. Still no wind and lots of clouds at 0945.

Stockton Harbor is like a good sized lake, with plenty of sailing room for lots of day sailing. A large fleet of boats was on moorings in the northeast corner, though we didn't go the mile and half over to take a close look. The old oil tanker unloading platform at the entrance appears to no longer be in use. This could be an anchorage for almost any blow where the wind was not expected to change direction while you were anchored, otherwise, the fetch in the new direction could make most any spot uncomfortable. Under cloudy skies, we pushed on to Fort Point.

We exchanged radio calls with the down-bound tanker New England just as we approached the narrows at the point. We agreed on a one-whistle (port to port) passing, and turned to starboard to give the tanker room. A fine old lighthouse and buildings stands high on the bluff, and a spit just beyond the point makes for beach walking. The cove above the point is really just a very big bay, and would give protection from a strong southwest or southeast breeze, but no shelter from any other direction. Not high on our future anchorages list.

Turning back south down Penobscot Bay, we set a course for Belfast on the western shore. Belfast was once the home of much wooden shipbuilding, but today is known as a center for credit card processing -- and processing tourists. As we approached the sun peaked through the clouds, and before we left, it was bright sun. The harbor is packed with boats on moorings, plus a town dock, and a classic lobster pound opposite the city. A tourist schooner with an unusual drop-down transom appears permanently moored to the dock.

Still with no wind, we started motoring on a course to pass through Gilkey Harbor on Islesboro Island. But the afternoon southerly finally blew in with 8 knots of breeze and we quickly made sail. Javelin loves beating to windward in winds around 10 knots, and we tacked our way south having an enjoyable ride. Abeam of Camden the wind went light, and we powered on to Hurricane Sound on Vinalhaven Island.

The delightful Long Cove at the north end of Hurricane Sound is perfectly protected, but by 4 pm one would expect it to be filled it's capacity of 3 or 4 boats. When we arrived there were about 5 boats on private moorings just outside the inner cove, but no big boats inside. We claimed the perfect (and probably only) anchorage spot for Javelin and were secure in a beautiful setting at 1621 hours.

Steve & Paul grilled the pork chops to perfection to accompany the mixed veggies. (No dessert.) The feature film was "Heart and Souls", with Robert Downey, Jr., Charles Grodin, Kyra Sedgwick, Elizabeth Shue & Tom Sizemore. With our early arrival and dinner, it was lights out before 2200.



[Click to enlarge]
Fort Pt. # 1 ...
[Click to enlarge]
lighthouse & ...
[Click to enlarge]
lemmings????
[Click to enlarge]
Belfast Harbor ...
[Click to enlarge]
with a classic ...
[Click to enlarge]
lobster pound & ...
[Click to enlarge]
power & sail.
[Click to enlarge]
A working waterfront ...
[Click to enlarge]
great green ...
[Click to enlarge]
transient dock ...
[Click to enlarge]
upper town.
[Click to enlarge]
What is this? ...
[Click to enlarge]
open-sterned schooner ...
[Click to enlarge]
Peacemaker.
[Click to enlarge]
Barn barge?
[Click to enlarge]
Long Cove Camp has ...
[Click to enlarge]
happy campers.
[Click to enlarge]
In Long Cove
[Click to enlarge]
Where we entered ...
[Click to enlarge]
cove abeam ...
[Click to enlarge]
house abeam ..
[Click to enlarge]
boats outside ...
[Click to enlarge]
inner end.
[Click to enlarge]
Setting sun ...
[Click to enlarge]
quiet water ...
[Click to enlarge]
peaceful night.


Go To Log Summary

Thursday, August 13th

A very quite night - great sleeping. An outboard-powered lobster boat whizzed past some time after 0600. With a full night's sleep, the crew was fed, cereal & blueberries this morning, and hoisting anchor at 0817. Light fog topped the trees on surrounding islands, and the Securitee radio call from the North Haven ferry confirmed there was fog on the open waters of lower Penobscott Bay.

We worked our way out of Hurricane Sound into the fog. The regular drill of radar and computer screen, plus two additional GPS units in the cockpit, helped pick our way west. Around Two Bush Island, we tracked a bunch of lobster boats, and actually saw one close aboard. Naturally, as soon as we cleared these radar targets, the sun broke through and visibility improved to at least two miles.

We powered on past Old Cilley Ledge, north of Brunt and Allen Islands where several weathered cottages stood stout and trim against the rock. Next was Eastern Egg Rock whici is a bird scantuary where Puffins have been reintroduced. They were off to their summer feeding grounds in the arctic, so the gulls and cormorants had the rock pretty much to themselves.

At 1148, just past Eastern Egg, we set sail, then hoisted the spinnaker at 1235, sailing in 7-8 knots. On port gybe we sailed southwest, until we got to a line where we could gybe and pass south of Damariscove Island. it was slow going, making about 5 knots most of the time with 7 knots of wind. We sharpened up around the island and headed for the Sheepscot River.

Naturally the wind headed us, and shortly after we passed west of The Cuckolds, we dropped the chute and powered into the river. Our intended destination was Ebencook Harbor, where we had had lunch, but not stayed the night. Steve was not particularly fond of it because we had a hard time setting the anchor - even just for lunch. While looking for alternate spots, we spotted Five Islands Harbor, which truned out to be a cozy working lobster harbor with a few moorings - at least four of which were free. Though it was already 1550 when we arrived, we got one.

There is a Lobster Shack on the town dock, and a little store a short ways down the road. Paul went ashore and came back with a peach ie and ice cream. That went well whith his chili -- it was definitely a deslicious Paul dinner! Our movie was a history of the New York Yacht Club, narrated by Gary Jobson, that Steve had brought along.

[Click to enlarge]
Thursday morning ...
[Click to enlarge]
what course????
[Click to enlarge]
hard at work
[Click to enlarge]
headed out ...
[Click to enlarge]
getting thicker ...
[Click to enlarge]
into lower Penobscot.
[Click to enlarge]
Approaching Two Bush ...
[Click to enlarge]
target at 11:30 position.
[Click to enlarge]
Approaching ...
[Click to enlarge]
Eastern Egg Rock ...
[Click to enlarge]
a Puffin santuary ...
[Click to enlarge]
they went north.
[Click to enlarge]
Damariscove Island ...
[Click to enlarge]
great house.
[Click to enlarge]
The Cuckolds ...
[Click to enlarge]
up close.
[Click to enlarge]
Hendricks Head Light
[Click to enlarge]
5 Islands Hbr ...
[Click to enlarge]
Malden I. ...
[Click to enlarge]
lots of gangways ...
[Click to enlarge]
the Lobster Shack ...
[Click to enlarge]
returning Paul has ...
[Click to enlarge]
pie & ice cream!
[Click to enlarge]
Perfect example ...
[Click to enlarge]
of a lobster boat.
[Click to enlarge]
Super cottage
[Click to enlarge]
Herring gull
[Click to enlarge]
Picture perfect.
[Click to enlarge]
Hendrick's Light again.


Go To Log Summary

Friday, August 14th

There had been zero wind all night, and at one point we bumped with a power boat on the next mooring. No harm done, and Steve & Paul, plus the other owner, pushed the boats apart.

Still no wind after an oatmeal and blueberry breakfast. We decided on a river cruise up the Sheepscot to explore Oven Mouth, a narrow passage in the Cross River about a mile above it's junction with the Sheepscot. It was beautiful, though tricky with a 3 knot current running out - against us going in, but pushing us almost scary fast on the way out. Lots of picture taking.

By 1030 we were almost back down to Five Islands and the breeze had filled in from the south. Sails up, engine off and we peat out to sea. With a funnel effect, the wind touch 13-14 knots, but bacedk off to 9-10 once out in the ocean. A long tack south enabled us to tack west and clear both Seguin Island and Cape Small while we enjoyed soup for lunch.

By 1400 we were closing with Halfway Rock off Harpswell - we are essentially a full day ahead of our "Plan." But that gives us room to set the spinnaker and sail back northeast to Sebasco for the night. However, the wind increased to the 13 - 15 knot range and we eased off and reached to the BS (Broad Sound) buoy off Casco Bay. There we did a "Javelin gybe", that's a tack instead of a gybe which eliminates the slam of the 75' by 25' main in this much breeze.

We reached back east at 8+ knots until we cleared Bold Dick rock, then ran off toward Sebasco at the entrance to the New Meadows River. Sebasco Estates is a resort boardering a semi-protected cove. It's multiple cottages, two restaurants, pub, plus golf and tennis seemed to attract families. We stoped at their dock to pump out out holding tanks, then picked up a mooring at the mouth of the harbor. By now there was almost no wind, but it seemed there would have been a rolling sea if a strong southwester were blowing.

We went ashore for dinner in the restaurant at 1800. They were also setting up for a lobsterbake on the lawn - $45 per person for all you can eat and drink! We opted for the restaurant, and sampled scallops, game hen, haddock, and steak among us. With the setting sun, at 1945, we were back aboard. With WiFi from Sebasco we were able to upload log pictures and check emails. Then, one by one, starting just after 2100, the crew dozed off to sleep.

[Click to enlarge]
Leaving Five Islands
[Click to enlarge]
Up the Sheepscott
[Click to enlarge]
Cross River divide
[Click to enlarge]
PICT6026
[Click to enlarge]
protected dock ...
[Click to enlarge]
working east ...
[Click to enlarge]
lots of flats ...
[Click to enlarge]
approaching Oven Mouth ...
[Click to enlarge]
boats in a pool ...
[Click to enlarge]
into Oven Mouth ...
[Click to enlarge]
lots of current ...
[Click to enlarge]
but straight ...
[Click to enlarge]
pots here too ...
[Click to enlarge]
quiet pool ...
[Click to enlarge]
shrink wrapped ...
[Click to enlarge]
floating home?
[Click to enlarge]
narrow going ...
[Click to enlarge]
got it.
[Click to enlarge]
headed back ...
[Click to enlarge]
great rocks ...
[Click to enlarge]
both sides ...
[Click to enlarge]
nice bridge ...
[Click to enlarge]
want a seat?
[Click to enlarge]
stacked rocks.
[Click to enlarge]
Oven Mouth passage
[Click to enlarge]
Competition was ...
[Click to enlarge]
too big, too fast.
[Click to enlarge]
Off Harpswell
[Click to enlarge]
Mel concentrates ...
[Click to enlarge]
on Sebasco.
[Click to enlarge]
Nice harbor ...
[Click to enlarge]
going ashore.
[Click to enlarge]
No wind
[Click to enlarge]
Shoreside
[Click to enlarge]
Indian or lobster?
[Click to enlarge]
Resort with ...
[Click to enlarge]
map.
[Click to enlarge]
At dinnertime ...
[Click to enlarge]
still no wind.
[Click to enlarge]
Prepping for a ...
[Click to enlarge]
clambake ...
[Click to enlarge]
lots left over.
[Click to enlarge]
After dinner.
[Click to enlarge]
Dockhouse
[Click to enlarge]
The "Lighthouse"
[Click to enlarge]
Dusk.


Go To Log Summary

Saturday, August 15th

With a very long and quiet night, the crew was up early. As Steve said, "What are we doing up at 0630 on a Saturday morning?" Eggs and sausage for breakfast; wipe down the dodger windows with the chamois; end-for-end the genny sheets; do the dishes and cast off, all before 0805. We're on our way to Harpswell Sound to rendezvous with Leighton & Karin McIlvaine. Oh, no wind.

We needed to arrive - and depart - before 1000. That's when the tide level in Harpswell Sound dropped below 4 feet, which was critical because there is only 4 feet of water at Leighton & Karin's dock at low water, and Javelin needs 7 feet to float. We pulled alongside their float at 0940, and with Karin & Leighton aboard were back into deeper water in ten minutes.

With the wind still very light, we threaded through a back door passage to Potts Harbor and into Casco Bay. Steve was less than enthusiastic, and he reminded all that, "Masts & keels are expensive; navigators are replaceable." Rick managed to call enough turns to stay in deep water - second guessed, as usual, by a pair of GPS's in the cockpit. We emerged into Casco Bay near Eagle Island, where Commodore Perry, the Arctic explorer, built his home. It's a great stop for another day.

By the time we reached Jewel Island there was 8 knots of breeze and Steve called for all plain sail. Off we went into the ocean with Karin at the helm and sailed past Halfway Rock. Another 4 miles out, we east off to the east and set the spinnaker -- which was rewarded by lunch. A gybe aimed us back toward Harpswell making over 6 knots in 9 knots of wind. As we headed shore, the wind went light, down came the sails, and we arrived at their float at 1445.

That was about 15 minutes before our target of 1500 when the tide would have bottomed out and risen to 4 feet. As we settled at the dock, the fathometer read 7.8 feet. Just enough. Javelin overhanging the little float made for some good pictures. While Leighton & Karin prepared some nibbles, we took pictures and cleaned up a bit ourselves.

The well-scrubbed crew looked just a bit like a Secret Service Detail coming up the lawn to join Karin & Leighton for some nibbles. They, thanks to Karin were delicious, and we munched away while looking at pictures from their recent trip to China. Then it was on down the road to dinner.

The tradition of dinners at Harpswell is lobsters. The place of choice for many years was Morse's Lobsters, about two miles north at a rustic, open dock overlooking the water where the lobster came ashore, and you dumped the shells right back over the railing into the water. Well, seems there was some kind of "permit" issue about three years ago, so we had to find another place. That was a long drive north, then east, then south to the shore of the New Meadows River. Then last year we tried Estes, south of Karin & Leighton at the lower end of Harpswell Neck. Good, but not Morse good. This year, the Morse family has taken over Estes, and it is now known as Morse's at Estes - great food and good location. Though Paul was the only one to actually have lobster this year, the food was good.

Leighton got a good sunset picture as we headed back to the boat. We needed to shove the dock before 2200 before the tide went down too low. We were away a bit before 2100 and anchored about 100 yards offshore for a restful night.

[Click to enlarge]
Sebasco to Harpswell
[Click to enlarge]
World War II ...
[Click to enlarge]
spotting towers.
[Click to enlarge]
Entering Harpswell ...
[Click to enlarge]
approaching the dock ...
[Click to enlarge]
Hi Karin!!!
[Click to enlarge]
Zig zag back door
[Click to enlarge]
that was fun ...
[Click to enlarge]
all smiles ...
[Click to enlarge]
Halfway Rock ...
[Click to enlarge]
my rock ...
[Click to enlarge]
no, seals' rock!
[Click to enlarge]
Lots of stones.
[Click to enlarge]
Lunch time
[Click to enlarge]
It's low tide at ...
[Click to enlarge]
Karin & Leighton's dock.
[Click to enlarge]
Local color
[Click to enlarge]
Break time.
[Click to enlarge]
Leighton waits for ...
[Click to enlarge]
Secret Service Detail ...
[Click to enlarge]
for Karin & the Crew
[Click to enlarge]
China pics
[Click to enlarge]
Sunset at Morse's at Estes


Go To Log Summary

Sunday, August 16th

The crack of dawn it was, as the sun broke the tree line just as the anchor came aboard at 0552. With chores and shopping to do at our next port, getting under way early gave us more time at the far end. Oatmeal under way was breakfast.

Once again the wind was light to nonexistent, and even without the autopilot working, the crew traced a straight red track down the computer screen to Wentworth Marina in Little Harbor, which is Portsmouth, New Hampshire / Kittery, Maine. We arrived, very uneventfully, at 1248. Both fuel tanks were topped off. Both holding tanks were pumped dry. And, after Steve backed Javelin neatly into into our slip (even the two gals assigned as dock assistants remarked that they had been told that there really wasn't much for them to do), we topped off the water tanks. Connecting shore power and water finished the initial hook-up.

Our missing crew member, Brian Klinger was aboard shortly. He and Lise live right next door in Rye, NH, and Brian had sufficiently recovered from his hernia surgery to welcome us for two days of fun. While Rick and Brian headed off to do shopping, a load of laundry, and uploading the log, Steve, Paul & Mel did a wash down fore and aft. Good thing the air condition was working, because it was hot and humid.

Lise joined the crew for cocktails aboard, then we all headed to the Oar House, along the Portsmouth waterfront, for a delicious dinner. Back aboard, a little reading and then into our bunks at the customary early hour.

[Click to enlarge]
Anchor detail at ...
[Click to enlarge]
sunrise ...
[Click to enlarge]
under way.
[Click to enlarge]
In Wentworth ...
[Click to enlarge]
looking good ...
[Click to enlarge]
step aboard ...
[Click to enlarge]
Sunday paper ...
[Click to enlarge]
last read.


Go To Log Summary

Monday, August 17th

As planned, Brian stepped aboard Javelin shortly after 0800 to join the crew for eggs and sausage breakfast. This was Special K day. Time to swap a sailboat for a power boat with Captain Klinger at the helm. Just as an aside, Brian, Mel & Paul are all licensed Coast Guard Captains. It was again hot and humid, with no promise of any cooling breeze. Brian suggested we split the day into activities that could be done in air conditioning and the rest afloat in the sunshine. Since there are always chores to do, we piled into Brian's car and took the scenic route to the Jackson's hardware store.

The first purchase was a at least one small brass machine screw to replace the headless one holding the brass ship's clock to the bulkhead. To be safe we got two sets of three in 3/8 and 1/2 inch lengths. Next on the list was an electrical project. When Javelin's 110 volt power system was installed (to be energized either with a big shore power cord, or the on-board generator) there was no outlet in the area of the port settee around the main salon table. That meant there was no easy way to power a computer while working at the table.

For many years we have taped a 9' extension cord along the back of the galley, from the aft bulkhead next to the propane and refrigeration controls, past the stove, around the freezer and fridge access lids, to the corner of the settee. Not only is this less than elegant, it runs perilously close to the stove burners -- as evidenced by the green tape protecting a scorch wound. We have talked about a more permanent fix, and Rick probed the lower reaches of the lockers and discovered that there was an existing 110 outlet at the back of the lowest locker that held most of the bowls and tupperware. It's function was to power the microwave, but there was one open plug. More poking suggested a way could be found forward to the settee area. So, while Steve was not up to cutting holes for a regular outlet, a sturdy 15' outdoor extension cord was purchased to see if it would do.

Since we were already in Kittery, Maine, rather than heading back to Javelin, we headed for Pepperill Cove where Special K is moored. Brian & Rick dinghied out and brought her to the dock where Steve, Mel and Paul stepped aboard. Worth mentioning is Brian's dinghy. It has a small electric outboard motor to go the 200 yards to Special K's mooring, and it stays in the water all the time. Brian has rigged up a small solar panel to charge the battery to run the motor, and a bilge pump with a float to take out rain water. An additional pump switch is wired at the very bow of the dinghy to take out was the float doesn't get, and a removable staff at the bow serves as a convenient post on which to drop Special K's mooring line for easy retrieval when returning.

After touring the little slough off the end of the harbor, we headed to sea. Heading southwest into a little breeze and flat water was refreshing, and in half an hour we entered Rye Harbor. This tiny inlet is a third lobster and fishing boats, a third small sailboats, and a third small power boats. We tried to get to the dock at Saunder's Restaurant, but it was small and a catamaran took up all the space.

Back to sea and into Portsmouth we went. Portsmouth Harbor, is, or at least ought to be, notorious for its swift and turbulent currents. A strong ebb with tide rips slowed our progress as we made our way in past the two lighthouses and the Portsmouth Navy Yard to Warren's Restaurant. This time we were the ones to take up the only dock space, and were soon seated for a late lunch. Paul continued his dedication to whole lobsters, while the rest of us settled for the "lobster torpedo", and oversized lobster roll about the size of a small submarine. They came with the well stocked salad bar, so we chowed down on good eats - but probably could have used a little more portion control!

Casting off, and now with the current, Brian threaded Special K's radar mast and radio antennas under a low bridge into the back channels that lead from Portsmouth's main harbor to Little Harbor where Javelin was waiting. With great skill Brian navigated a narrow channel with only 3' of water at low tide - and it had to be close to low tide to get under the two bridges. We followed one lead right to the end, then back and out into Little Harbor. Steve & Rick got off to do Javelin chores while Paul & Mel stayed aboard to help Brian take Special K
back to her mooring.

We had left the air conditioning running on Javelin, but when we went below the main cabin was up to 79 degrees. A quick check showed that the main cabin unit was not putting out air, and a peak at the unit behind the port settee showed it completely frozen up. A hot sponging, and then tricking it into thinking it should heat the cabin had the ice melted and cool air blowing in about twenty minutes. Then it was time to put the clock screws in - which went like, well, clockwork.

Next was the extension cord project. All of the cushions came up, doors and drawers were removed, all of the pots, pans, bowls, lids, coffee gear and thermos bottle came out of the cockers under the galley. Now there was access to the crevices where we might run the cord to the outlet that powers the microwave. Though it looked like there was a messenger string under the fridge and freezer, the two ends were different strings - neither opposite end of which we could find. Unscrewing a section of floorboards, we found a new path. Pushing a tape measure the 3' under the fridge bridged the gap and soon we had the new cord run and plugged in. Success!

However, we now had this pile of cookware, some of which had not been out of the lockers for many years judging by the black spots and smudges. The lockers themselves were less than pristine, so Rick set to work lying on the floor and reaching in with a bottle of 409 and paper towels to brighten things up. Steve set up a washing production line and scrubbed clean all the cookware. Naturally, Brian, Paul & Mel arrived just as the last items were dried and being neatly stowed again.

Lise joined us for a simple spaghetti, meatballs and salad dinner aboard. We finished off the evening with a songfest - particularly since we now had our Dartmouth-days "Yachtsmen" complete with Brian aboard. With all chiming in, we even tackled some of the less frequently sung ditties. There was Blue Water LIne, Dartmouth Calypso, London Zoo, Melody D'Amour, and Tables in the Kremlin (to the Whiffenpoof tune). Also into the mix was the sort of beer-hall style "Lord It's Hard To Be Humble" (when you're perfect in ev-er-y way) which Brian taught a bunch of Lise's Danish friends. We wrapped it up with Lise's choice of Follow Me, whose chorus goes:

Follow me where I go
What I do and who I know
Make it part of you to be a part of me.
Follow me up and down
All the way and all around
Take my hand and I will follow too.


[Click to enlarge]
Monday breakfast ...
[Click to enlarge]
was good ...
[Click to enlarge]
Brian on duty.
[Click to enlarge]
Brian at the helm!
[Click to enlarge]
Time for a ride ...
[Click to enlarge]
take a look at ...
[Click to enlarge]
Chauncy Creek
Lobster Pound
[Click to enlarge]
now which way? ...
[Click to enlarge]
approaching Rye Harbor
[Click to enlarge]
Ex-navy prison
[Click to enlarge]
In control ...
[Click to enlarge]
side kick ...
[Click to enlarge]
thin water.
[Click to enlarge]
Leaving Special K
[Click to enlarge]
Ride ashore ...
[Click to enlarge]
great dinghy ...
[Click to enlarge]
well equipped ...
[Click to enlarge]
among friends.
[Click to enlarge]
Monday dinner.
[Click to enlarge]
and song fest ...
[Click to enlarge]
sing out!


Go To Log Summary



Tuesday, August 18th

Quietly, at 0635, Javelin eased from her slip, glided out the fairway, and reved her engine to 2200 heading south for Cape Ann. A few lobster boats were scattered across the glassey waters between Portsmouth and the Isles of Shoals, barely visible in the morning haze.

Green can #1 at Cape Ann passed abeam at 0937. Always wanting to sail the boat, even into a headwind, Captain Steve ordered all plain sail at 1005. The course to Scituate Harbor was 211 degrees - the wind was from 212 degrees at 9.6 knots. We bore away to the west, aimed at the shore of the Gloucester penninsula, a hazy3 miles away. Though the wind speed registered 8 - 9 knots, the water surface was hardly ruffeled. As we closed with the land, wind decreased, and finally, about a mile off, we rolled up the jib and turned on the engine.

We motor-sailed close hauled, still not on a direct course for Scituate, until 1245 when we were a little more than 8 miles from Scituate. Mel challenged Rick as he took the helm to speed things up. We were making 6.6 knots in 8 knots of breeze. Javelin was perfectly balanced with the jib slightly eased in the light air. With only tiny movements of the wheel, the speed climbed to 7.5 knots as the wind touched 9 knots. Then things got funny.

The wind was blowing from 151 degrees, and slowly decreasing. At one point we were sailing at 6.6 knots in 4.8 knots of wind. Soon there after we were sailing at 3.3 knots on a course of 211 degrees with the wind blowing at 4 knots from 212 degrees -- that's sailing directly into the wind -- an impossibility. What was happening was wind shear. at the surface, the dying wind was from the southeast. 75 feet up in the air, at the top of the mast, the new wind was coming from the southwest - 90 degrees different. The very top parts of the main and jib were actually feeling wind from the leeward side, but the rest of the sails were working with the old southeast wind.

Finally the southwest breeze filled in with a nice 10 - 12 knots. Not wishing to miss some good sailing, and not wanting to go ashore where it was 90 degrees and humid, we sailed up and down the coast for about two hours enjoying some good sailing.

At 1630 we entered Scituate Harbor, and hailed the Scituate Harbor Yacht Club on channel 9. The dock man confirmed our spot on the float, and replied to Steve question about "7 feet of draft" with a "No Problem." Our bow stopped about 15' from the dock as the keel dug into the mud. It took tying the launch alongside to get off. We were directed to a mooring out by the channel - and ran aground again as we tried to get out among the moored boats. Finally we were floating nicely in 11 feel of water at the mooring - and it was just above low tide.

The launch returned about ten minutes later with Sean & Marina McCarthy - and big cooler with ten lobsters. This all came about through the efforts of Rick's San Francisco Bay friend Art Fowler, another Islander 36 owner. Art and Sean grew up together in Scituate, and Art even ran the club launch for a time. Sean, like Art, is a retired pilot, but has maintained a side avocation of lobstering. Sean has 465 lobster pots, and works them from inside the harbor up to 10 miles off shore when the lobsters move out in winter. We had a wonderful conversation about lobstering, and toasted Sean and Art as we consumed 4 steaming lobsters for dinner. The last six are in the fridge for dinner with Jay & Hasty tomorrow night.

[Click to enlarge]
Arriving at ...
[Click to enlarge]
Scituate Harbor ...
[Click to enlarge]
lots of boats.
[Click to enlarge]
Sean & Marina McCarthy ...
[Click to enlarge]
brought lobsters!
[Click to enlarge]
Much appreciated ...
[Click to enlarge]
steaming hot.
[Click to enlarge]
Our new plug.
[Click to enlarge]
As sun sets ...
[Click to enlarge]
good colors ...
[Click to enlarge]
wind going light ...
[Click to enlarge]
contrasts ...
[Click to enlarge]
coming in ...
[Click to enlarge]
concentration ...
[Click to enlarge]
last one in ...
[Click to enlarge]
removing colors.


Go To Log Summary

Wednesday, August 19th

A full day ahead, so we shoved just after sunrise - 0603. With a bit of a west wind, we rolled out the jib to add a few tenths to our motoring speed as we straight-lined the 28 miles to the Cape Cod Canal.

Between about 0700 and 0730 we passed through schools of fish with their dorsal fins breaking the surface. Paul estimated there were thousands of them. They all seemed to be about the same size - around 18 - 24 inches, and would splash off as Javelin's bow wave neared. We tried some pictures and guessed they were either small sharks or, Paul's guess, menhaden or "moss bunkers."

Into the Cape Cod Canal at 0928, almost exactly at the turn of the current in our favor. From a speed of 7.7 knots over the bottom, our speed increased to 11.2 knots by the time we exited the CCC less than an hour later. Jay & Hasty Evans were still doing some shopping, but had left a dinghy on the mooring in front of their house on Scraggy Neck. Nestled in the trees on the north side of the neck it's a beautiful place to view the water, though this year we didn't even set foot on shore. It has been a total of 41 miles from Scituate for the morning run.

By 1145 Jay & Hasty were aboard and we shoved off for some day sailing. We rendezvoused with the J-160 Heron at Sippican Harbor. She's owned by Jay Pasco-Anderson, and had his 14 year old daughter Emily on board for crew. The two of them were an equal match for the six of us as we sailed side by side for 36 miles down, and back up, Buzzards Bay. With the wind in the 12-14 knot range, and occasionally higher, we tucked in a first reef in the main. We were still a touch faster going upwind against Heron. She also tucked in a reef, but that didn't seem to make much difference. As the wind went lighter the reefs came out, and with a slightly larger jib, Heron was just a touch faster. We parted company and returned to Jay & Hasty's mooring at 1632 after some great sailing and lots of picture taking.

That left us a quick hour for some nibbles and a beverage before casting off for a Wednesday evening "beer can" race that started right off Jay & Hasty's house. the attraction for the evening was yet another J-160, Avatar. She came boiling in with a big jenny, and it was sure to be a real contest. With the wind instrument saying wind was in the 14 - 16 knot range, we tucked in a reef in the last 10 minutes before the start. Perhaps distracted by that effort and strategizing the start, we lost track of the signal flags on the Race Committee boat, but had the time sequence from the prior start.

When approaching at what we thought was the start, the RC didn't fire a gun or fly a flag, and we thought we might have been a minute off as Avatar was heading in the other direction. We converged with Avatar, charging directly at her on port tack sailing down the starting line toward the committee boat, while she barrelled down the line toward us on starboard. We passed abeam less than ten feet apart, and turned to round her stern, trying to prevent her from starting her tack. She swung early and we just cleared her stern as she tacked onto port. Even with hails to "stay up" she was bearing off trying to trim her big jib. We couldn't quite break through to leeward, though we could point higher with the reefed main and smaller jib. Unfortunately, we could both lay the first mark, so her leeward position and being able to foot off kept her ahead of us at the first mark.

We picked up a radio transmission from the RC that they had "noted our starting time" and told us to keep going - after what had been a delightful America's Cup-like match racing start. We later figured out that the RC had messed up the start timing and flown the Answering Pennant, the Postponement signal instead of the start. But were we locked in a delightful match race and carried on.

It was a long-and-a-short beat to the second mark, only 1.6 miles away, and we tried to induce a tacking dual since we could tack faster, but the leg was so short she only took two tacks and we did four. The last two legs were down wind, and even with our reef shook out, her bigger headsail pulled her steadily away. But it was really fun, and Avatar came alongside to chat after we were back on Jay & Hasty's mooring. The 11 miles racked up while racing brought the days total sailing to 88 miles!

The last six of Sean's lobsters were not pleased to be dropped into steaming water, but they sure were delicious. We popped a bottle of champagne that Jay & hasty brought and toasted to a great day of sailing with some very special friends.

[Click to enlarge]
Scituate sunrise ...
[Click to enlarge]
early morning driver ...
[Click to enlarge]
with coffee.
[Click to enlarge]
Hundreds of ...
[Click to enlarge]
young sharks? ...
[Click to enlarge]
or menhaden?
[Click to enlarge]
CCC at Sandwich ...
[Click to enlarge]
want one?
[Click to enlarge]
last bridge CCC
[Click to enlarge]
Welcome Hasty & ...
[Click to enlarge]
Jay.
[Click to enlarge]
Heron ...
[Click to enlarge]
a sister ship.
[Click to enlarge]
Concentration.
[Click to enlarge]
Hasty's got 'em ...
[Click to enlarge]
covered ...
[Click to enlarge]
happy too ...
[Click to enlarge]
who's driving? ...
[Click to enlarge]
she is & ...
[Click to enlarge]
happy too!
[Click to enlarge]
Jay says ...
[Click to enlarge]
My turn!
[Click to enlarge]
DSC01490
[Click to enlarge]
With one reef.
[Click to enlarge]
We chase.
[Click to enlarge]
Close hauled.
[Click to enlarge]
Eased off ...
[Click to enlarge]
Want water dad? ...
[Click to enlarge]
thanks ...
[Click to enlarge]
me too ...
[Click to enlarge]
Bye!
[Click to enlarge]
Race time ...
[Click to enlarge]
new competition ...
[Click to enlarge]
Avatar.
[Click to enlarge]
After the race ...
[Click to enlarge]
they were fast ...
[Click to enlarge]
came for a chat ...
[Click to enlarge]
good group ...
[Click to enlarge]
bye Avatar
[Click to enlarge]
Very busy day ...
[Click to enlarge]
on Buzzards bay.
[Click to enlarge]
Sean's last lobsters ...
[Click to enlarge]
were great!
[Click to enlarge]
Thanks.


Go To Log Summary

Thursday, August 20th

Away before sunrise - 0534 - why? Well maybe to get to Stonington before the forecasted possibility of "showers & thunderstorms in the afternoon." Not only did we not get them, we also got no wind. It was uneventful straight line motoring out of Buzzards Bay at 0835.

We did, however, pick up fog as we entered Rhode Island Sound and started the 23 mile run across to Point Judith. Visibility was about 25 yards, and stayed that way all the way until we were insde the outer breakwater at Stonington. Plenty of radio and radar traffic to watch made for a tedious day with all hands keeping a close watch on things. Hot and 100% humidity had water dripping off of everything, even the under side of the dodger. Throw in some rolling swells from the south and it had to rank as the lowest passage of the cruise.

Steve's friends Barnaby Blach and wife Marion were going to join us for dinner at the Stonington Yacht Club, but Barnaby got hung up doing a boat survey and had to cancel. We decided to improvise and pulled out the chicken for dinner that had been bumped by lots of lobsters and left over lasagna and chili. Add both a big green salad and a medly of the remaining frozen veggies, and we were a long way toward clearing out the fridge. Since we were tided to the dock, the BBQ was out, so Rick warmed the frozen chicken breasts in a pot of water, then finished them off with a quick pan fry to add some color and spices. Dessert was the last of the applesauce with the last of the whipped cream can.

Our movie was GoodFellas with Robert Ne Niro, Joe Pesci, and Ray Liotta. A hail from the dock about 2000 turned out to be Ben Blake and his friend Carol. This rounded out our J-160 link-ups as Ben has his Atlantic moored in Stonington. We chatted for a bit, then returned to our movie. The air conditioning ran all night as the humidity hung on.

(No pictures today.)

Go To Log Summary

Friday, August 21st

Horse headed for barn? Why else would we be under way at 0635 with just 28 miles to go. It was so bad the sail cover was already on the main (what - no faith in the "south 10-15" forecast?) The dock lines were not stowed but sorted out to bow, stern and spring positions on deck. The electric cord, though coiled and tied, was propped next to the mast ready to be plugged in to the forward connection when we reached home port. Even Steve's requested chicken salad for lunch was prepared as we left the harbor. Astern, off to the east, a black bank of fog struggled to capture the rising sun. We're homeward bound.

Back in Westbrook at 0947 after a strong push from the flooding tide - at times making more than 10 knots over the bottom. three hours of filling the fuel tanks, pumping out the holding tanks, then unloading gear and washing down. We polished off Steve's requested chicken salad for lunch, then finished cleaning out the freezer and fridge and left the boat.

After three weeks of great sailing for 1,115 miles with only an hour of light rain, severe thunderstorms are bearing down on Steve's house in Scarsdale with peels of thunder hurrying these last words to press.

[Click to enlarge]
Heading home.
[Click to enlarge]
Refuel - pump out!
[Click to enlarge]
The End.


Go To Log Summary

Clear Sailing.

Rick Van Mell vanmells@ix.netcom.com




Return to Main Islander 36 Menu