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Off Mistake Harbor
Maine
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Javelin 2010 Maine Cruise
August 2 - 20, 2010

For the eleventh time, Steve Blecher's 53' J-160, Javelin takes a tried and true, mostly Dartmouth grad, crew on a cruise to Maine. The Crew:
Steve (Dartmouth '64) boat Javelin, home port Westbrook, CT
Rick Van Mell ('63), boat Vanishing Animal, home port San Francisco Bay
Mel Converse ('60), boat Whim, home port Chesapeake Bay
Paul Wharton (Duke '64), boat Solitude, home port Stamford, CT,
the above boarding at Westbrook, CT, plus
Brian Klinger ('62), boat Special K, home port Portsmouth, NH, boarded at Northeast Harbor, ME.

The Plan was to work quickly east, traversing Long Island Sound, Narraganset Bay, Buzzards Bay, through the Cape Cod Canal direct to Northeast Harbor, a run of 280 miles, and eventually touching Canadian waters, then working back west in easy steps. Usual planned stops included Harpswell Sound to see Leighton & Karin McIlvaine, then stops in Boston to see Jeffrey & Jen Blecher + 2 grandchildren, and Mel's daughter Mate, husband Brian + 2 grandchildren, and south through the Cape Cod Canal for a visit with Jay ('64) and Hasty Evans at Scraggy Neck before returning to Westbrook.

That was The Plan, and Shopping List, but you'll just have to read on to see what happened when the wind hit the plan! Pictures by Mel Converse, Brian Klinger, Paul Wharton, Bob Miller and Rick Van Mell are grouped between days. There may even be a few movie clips too. The table below summarizes daily runs and the date is a link to that day's log. Elasped time is generally time under way and has sometimes been adjusted for lunch stops. Cells with a darker background color represent changes from the original Plan.


Log Summary


Day Date From To Depart Arrive Elapsed Plan Track Ave Engine Engine
Miles Miles Speed Hour Time
HH:MM NM NM Knots Meter Hours
1 Mon 8/2 Westbrook (at sea) 04:50 n/a 209.5
2 Tue 8/3 (at sea) Northeast Hbr. n/a 14:28 33:38:00 281 280.8 8.3 243.2 33.7
3 Wed 8/4 Northeast Hbr. Cross I. 09:51 17:08 7:17 52 56.5 7.8 250.2 7.0
4 Thu 8/5 Cross I. St. Andrews 06:43 13:09 6:26 45 45.2 6.2 257.5 7.3
5 Fri 8/6 St. Andrews Letang Hbr. 09:48 16:00 6:12 26 40.4 5.5 261.1 3.6
6 Sat 8/7 Letang Hbr. Grand Manan 07:48 15:05 7:17 26 51.0 7.7 262.3 1.2
7 Sun 8/8 Grand Manan Harbor De Lute 10:39 14:23 3:44 29 26 7.0 263.4 1.1
8 Mon 8/9 Hbr De Lute Cobscook 08:44 14:46 3:00 21 21.0 7.0 266.8 3.4
9 Tue 8/10 Cobscook Mistake Hbr 06:33 16:05 9:32 41 68.1 7.1 274.4 7.6
10 Wed 8/11 Mistake Hbr Stave Hbr 09:39 16:18 6:39 47 41.6 6.3 278.6 4.2
11 Thu 8/12 Stave Hbr Northeast Hbr. 08:46 12:20 0 14 25.7 7.2 281.6 3.0
12 Fri 8/13 Northeast Hbr. Northeast Hbr. 10:28 15:31 5:03 0 28.1 5.6 282.2 0.6
13 Sat 8/14 Northeast Hbr. Linekin Bay 05:24 16:15 10:51 57 79.9 7.4 291.5 9.3
14 Sun 8/15 Linekin Bay Harpswell Snd 08:39 13:47 5:03 42 35.7 6.9 293.3 1.8
15 Mon 8/16 Harpswell Snd Wentworth 05:49 12:50 7:01 55 55.3 7.7 300.6 7.3
16 Tue 8/17 Wentworth Boston Harbor 05:48 13:12 7:24 57 56.6 7.6 308.6 8.0
17 Wed 8/18 Boston Harbor Boston Harbor 2 day sails 4:30 0 19.6 4.4 311.6 3.0
18 Thu 8/19 Boston Harbor Scraggy Neck 06:28 16:56 9:48 59 73.3 7.5 320.5 8.9
19 Fri 8/20 Scraggy Neck Westbrook 05:09 16:47 11:38 89 90.0 7.7 331.2 10.7
Totals: 941 1094.8 7.5 121.7


Sunday, August 1st

Steve had already made shopping runs to Costco and A&P, but the fresh stuff and odds and ends still needed to be acquired. Ten years of practice simplifies provisioning. Rick & Steve grabbed shopping carts. Rick held the list and assigned Mel to get one or two items, Steve to get one or two more, and then turned to getting a couple himself. Systematically we worked through the fresh vegetable section, the bread section, the meats, canned goods and dairy sections, and saved the frozen things for last.

We finished up at the A&P by 0930 and headed for Costco. In the warm sunshine we waited with a crowd of 50 for the doors to open at 1000, and were pulled in with the hoard. It only took 17 minutes to get the big pork loin, the 6-pack of lettuce, the Jarlsberg Deli Thin Swiss Light, the ham, the turkey, a bag of mozzarella sticks, a bag of shrimp and some nuts. We considered it a good omen that a young deer watched from the roadside as we drove back to Steve's house in Scarsdale.

With Amy away herself for three weeks, Steve and the crew were free to raid the fridge for those things which were available. Using the 4 page list, we pulled together the things which were already on hand, cut up and bagged the new purchases, and packed them into coolers and tote bags for the trip to Javelin. We picked up Paul on the other side of Scarsdale at 1:45, added his duffel, and most importantly, his two gourmet lasagnas and two frozen chilis, then headed for Westbrook, Connecticut.

With only about half the food of previous trips (because Steve had already put it aboard), we managed with a single run of three dock carts to get get everything from the parking lot to the boat. A short chain gang, and it was aboard. Rick set to work stowing the food, while the rest of the crew stowed duffel bags and made up their bunks.

Paul had made a gift of a new inflatable dinghy to Javelin, and now it was time to put it together. It looked great inflated on the dock, but we had to deflate it a bit to get the motor mount bracket installed on the stern. Next was the assembly and christening of the Torqeedo electric outboard motor. Neatly rigged, including safety lines, the little motor purred to life and Steve navigated the little cove near the boat in short order. Paul tried it too and declared victory.

Chores now complete, the crew headed for the Boom restaurant ashore for dinner. Then an early bed time to dream of a dawn departure.

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Steve's house ...
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garage, Mel, & ...
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Mel's car.
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Steve's ready
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Costco stuff ...
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fridge chilling.
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Starting to load ...
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duffels first ...
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then food ...
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more room?
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Picking up Paul ...
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more stuff ...
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The crew is ready.
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Unloading at
Westbrook ...
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let's roll.
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Easy down ...
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dock walk.
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The black mast ...
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is Javelin ...
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well said ...
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looking fast.
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Time to board ...
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pass things up ...
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open up ...
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here it comes.
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Fridge stowed ...
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freezer too ...
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Paul's great lasagana!
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Two drawers full ...
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beverage fridge ...
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plus backups ...
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backup backups!
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And behind here ...
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more backups.
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Bread shelf ...
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Veggies stand ...
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crackers & cookies.
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Generator, Air con.
& tankage panel
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getting cooler.
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Rick's bunk ...
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made up.
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New dinghy from Paul
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Mounting the bracket ...
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takes a village.
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Pumping up
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See if it fits ...
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looking good ...
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perfect holder.
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Mounting engine is ...
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successful!

New Dinghy Test




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Electric power ...
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maiden voyage.
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Paul tries too!
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Westbrook harbor.
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Ready to go ...
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all loaded
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Carina won ...
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the Bermuda race.


Go To Log Summary

Monday, August 2nd

Before sunrise, at 0450, the dock lines were aboard and Javelin was backing away from her slip. Eight minutes later she cleared Westbrook channel, Steve pushed the throttle to 2300 RPM, and we were making 8 knots in the direction of Maine. A clear sky and light winds made for a beautiful sunrise under way.

Our cruise course takes us through the waters of five states and, this year, Canada. We start from Westbrook, Connecticut heading east in Long Island Sound. Long Island Sound ends at three places. Most southerly is Plum Gut out by Long Island, the middle part is called The Race, and the northerly end is through Fishers Island Sound. Mystic Seaport lies on the north side of Fishers Island Sound. We take the northern route, which ends at Watch Hill, Rhode Island and begins Block Island Sound. Block Island lies about 9 miles south of Pt. Judith, which also marks the transition to Rhode Island Sound. That continues until you enter Buzzards Bay and Massachusetts waters. At the head of Buzzards Bay we pass through the Cape Cod Canal into Cape Cod Bay. Once north of Provincetown at the tip of the Cape, you are either in Massachusetts Bay if you aim for Cape Ann (where you would find Gloucester), or simply in the Atlantic Ocean if you are headed directly to Maine. North of Cape Ann, the ocean is tagged with the Bigelow Bight, and more broadly, the Gulf of Maine. When we pass through Portsmouth on the return trip, we will be in New Hampshire waters. Finally, going farther east Canadian Grand Manan Island lies diagonally 6 to 10 miles off the Maine coast where the US ends and Canada begins. One of the first day chores is rigging the jacklines. These are lines run from bow to stern to which a person can clip a tether from a harness so they would not be thrown overboard, yet still walk the length of the boat to accomplish something. Javelin uses a 1' wide nylon web, like a narrow seat belt for these.

There was little wind in the morning hours, so we rigged a new sun shade awning to provide shade in the cockpit for the watch on deck. By 2 pm, as we passed New Bedford (the once famous whaling port), the wind had filled in to a nice 11 - 15 knots but it was directly astern and not strong enough to drive us at the 8 knots we wanted to maintain to get all the way to Maine on schedule.

We entered the Cape Cod Canal at 1508 (3:08 pm), stopped for fuel at Sandwich, and were into Cape Cod Bay at 1715 after fighting the current through the Canal. It was a particularly warm and dry evening for the ocean, and neither a heavy jacket nor wet suit pants were required. A blood red moon burned through the clouds at 2304 (11:04 pm) when we were 33 miles east of Cape Ann.

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Sunrise ...
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time to rig the ...
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jacklines ...
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on transom too.
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Clearing
Long Sand Shoal
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Beautiful morning
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Nav station.
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Autopilot driving ...
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new awning ...
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provides shade ...
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on Steve.
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Condiment locker ...
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scrubbed clean ...
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and re-stowed.
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Paul's pleased.
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North Dumpling ...
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south of Mystic Seaport
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Watch Hill light ...
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in morning light ...
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well marked ...
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Mansion & ...
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big hotel.
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Casual cruiser
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Pt. Judith light
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and grounds.
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Making log entry
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Paul on watch
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Cape Cod homes ...
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approaching Canal ...
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training ship for ...
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Merchant Marine.
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1st Canal bridge ...
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Paul's ready ...
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Mel's relaxed.
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Railroad bridge ...
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Highway bridge ...
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is big.
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Dishes are done.


Go To Log Summary

Tuesday, August 3rd

Mel came on watch to join Rick at midnight. The last quarter moon was hidden behind black clouds, but moon light illuminated the tops of clouds seen overhead through gaps. A few warning drops said it was time for wet gear, and Rick got suited up in time to let Mel duck below as a shower washed the boat. It only lasted about 15 minutes but it was relatively heavy, and thankfully had little wind with it. The deep black curtain from sea to sky moved slowly from just off the starboard bow to abeam, and finally off the stern quarter by the time Steve came up to relieve Rick at 0200.

Off and on we had rolled out the jib with the wind still dead astern. When the pressure was in the 15 knot range, or higher, it added at least half a knot. When the wind backed off below 15 knots, there was not enough apparent wind to keep the jib stable as Javelin rolled in the seas.

It was mostly cloudy and uneventful through the day. Every two hours one person would come on deck for a four hour watch, so you had one person for company for the first half of your watch, and a different one for the second half. At out maximum we were 53 miles offshore when we passed Portland.

We closed with Long Island, just south of Mt. Desert, at 1300 Tuesday afternoon, and were tied up at Clifton Dock for fuel in Northeast Harbor at 1428. We'd made the run in a fast 33 hours and 38 minutes.

It took a while for the dock crew to move a boat before we could get into our slip at the dock, but then Steve neatly backed Javelin right into place. We went through the usual dockside drill of connecting the electrical power cord, switching the 110 volt system from the generator to the shore power, connecting a water line which gave us an unlimited supply and didn't need the pump for pressure, and shutting down the navigation systems.

A hardware store run, a stop at the Pine Tree Market, and a library run for WiFi to upload the log filled the rest of the afternoon. Dinner at the Docksider was good - better than it had been for a couple of years and more its old self. The pictures show the simplicity of the place, and you'll just have to take our word that the lobsters were good -- a treat from Paul. Then an early bed time.
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Tuesday morning ...
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smile.
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Rick's watch.
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Mel's turn.
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Lunch snacks
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Log entry
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Paul's salad
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Approaching NE Hbr.
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Mt. Desert Island
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Northeast Harbor
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harbor ahead ...
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Acadia National Park
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Southwest Harbor
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Checking, checking
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Into NE Hbr
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Clifton Dock ...
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fuel stop ...
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chief filler.
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The dock ...
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ramp ashore ...

Docking in Northeast Harbor




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waiting for space ...
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our slip ...
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tied up ....
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looking for ...
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Rick.
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Happy Campers.
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Long dock
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Character boat & ...
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characters.
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The famous ...
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Docksider ...
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busy oustisde ...
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waiting for a table ...
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read them all ...
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learning to row ...
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ready to order ...
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the best choices ...
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across the middle ...
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good flavors ...
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and gear ...
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& humor too.
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Great place for ...
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lobster ...
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family night ...
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kid night ...
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date night 1 ...
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date night 2 ...
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finished.
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Frankly Scallop ,I
don't give a Clam!
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Good night.


Go To Log Summary

Wednesday, August 4th

A well-earned eggs & sausage breakfast started the day, with orange marmalade and grape jam for the English muffins. Rick made a small reprovisioning run to the Pine Tree Market as the crew readied Javelin for departure.

Steve's friends, Arnie and Ronna Ziegel, owners of the Tartan 4100 Metaphor, stopped by in their dinghy to say hello. They were on a mooring out in the harbor. We have seen or spoken with them on many a cruise, and Arnie remarked he still goes back to the old cruise pages to enjoy the pictures.

It was cloudy with about 2 miles of visibility when we shoved off at 0951, headed for Cross Island, 52 planned miles away. For the first time in the cruise we set the main, and then the spinnaker with the prospect of a fine sail ahead. For a brief time it was glorious in 16 knots of breeze behind Sutton Island as we touched 10.0 knots with about a knot of current in our favor. Then the wind dropped to 12 knots and went aft. Large seas left over from two days of southwest winds rolled the boat and threatened to wrap the chute around the headstay. Down it came. Even the main, with it's heavy boom was slamming around on the 4 - 6 foot rolling seas. So down it came too, and we were back under engine power.

The wind went up and down, even touching 20 knots, but still almost dead astern making it impractical to carry sail and keep up our speed. The Maine expression of sailing "Down East" was proved here. The compass course from Northeast Harbor to Cross Island is 90 degrees magnetic - due east. When you think of going from the US to Canada you mentally think you are going north, but with 19 degrees west compass variation it's more east than north in Maine.

The good news was that the sun had come out and it would have been a perfect day, were it not for the corkscrew rolling down the swells which limited time below. The fine old cutter painting in the main cabin took on a decided list to port. Lunch became Mozzarella cheese sticks wrapped with a slice of ham, individually prepared in the cockpit. Much better than trying to spread bread and make stuff down below.

At 1445 we changed the plan and turned in to Moose Peak Channel at Mistake Harbor to get out of the seas. It was immediately flat and beautifully sunny. We threaded our way past fish pens and numerous tiny islands and rocks to the eastern end of the Jonesport channel. Then we headed back east just to the south of Roque Island. Again there were some rolling seas, partly augmented by reflected waves off the rock islands. With a bit of discussion, and a reference to Steve's quote "Keels & Masts are Expensive, Navigators are replaceable," we threaded our way through a quarter mile gap between Great Spruce and Double Shot islands. The problem is a 7' spot dead center and a rock to the right. With Paul at the helm and Steve and Rick comparing GPS readings the passage was easily accomplished and we turned east in calm water again.

This new route took us through narrow but deep Foster Channel, past well-named Stone Island and across Machias Bay to Cross Island. Our target anchorage is formed by the Cutler peninsula to the north, Cross Island to the south and east, and Mink Island to the west. A wide 11 foot bench makes for firm anchor holding ground, if there aren't lobster pots too close together. the 12' tide reminds you that you still need lots of scope on the anchor line. A field of about two dozen 200' tall radio towers saturate the Cutler peninsula. They are military run and probably very low frequency, very long distance, radio communications. Mel's cell phone signaled, "radio interference."

We arrived at 1708, found a place to drop the hook, let the engine idle to cool and were all secure by 1720. Brian & Paul set up the cockpit table and Rick supplied an array of goodies to nibble - including some shrimp, a first for our cruises, thanks to a frozen bag grabbed at Costco. To complete the surf & turf motif, Steve wrestled Rick's well marinated three pound London Broil onto the grill. An initial check revealed that the wind had blown out the flame, but with a relight Steve sent below a nicely cooked steak to join the traditional first-night-at-anchor mashed potatoes and salad dinner. Dessert was Maine blueberries with whipped cream - enhanced by a surprise Oreo stash at the bottom of the glass.

It was cold on deck. Normally a great evening for a movie. Paul read off the long list of traditional favorites, but in the end, and after a long day, the crew voted to hit their bunks. Steve was gone by 8:30, Paul & Mel shortly after 9:00, and Rick & Brian by 10:00.

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Charlie ...
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wanted breakfast ...
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not bad.
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Smiling faces.
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She took our picture
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Thanks.
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A visit from ...
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Arnie & Ronna
Ziegel, Metaphor
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Out to sea.
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A word of caution.
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Head boat.
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finally under sail ...
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chute set too.
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Day's plan.
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We were really rolling
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Turning toward ...
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Moose Peak Light
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big swells ...
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but nice inside
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Our path
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Fish pens ...
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are big operation ...
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I'll take some.
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Hard at work
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Typical spot
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Back to open water.
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Double Shot I.
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Libby Island &
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light.
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Stone Island ...
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is well named ...
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quarry that!
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Cutler antennas ...
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are huge ...
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and powerful and ...
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well insulated.
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Enough GPS?
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Mink Island
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Old Cross I. CG
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Our detour.
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Riding sail set.
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Well worn.
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Well deserved.
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Steak dinner ...
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gets smiles.


Go To Log Summary

Thursday, August 5th

The slam of the head door and Steve & Mel's voices signaled Rick that it was time to hit the deck. Since someone was already in the head, Rick grabbed his already laid out change of socks & underwear, pulled on the heavy shirt laid out the evening before, slipped into the pair of pants handing on the light, and emerged into the cabin, hair akimbo, with a hearty "Good Morning" to Steve & Mel. Then he looked at his watch. "What?! It's 0553!" "So," Steve replied, "it's 0653 Canadian Atlantic Daylight Time."

As ever, the Javelin crew proved it runs on an early-bird schedule. The run to St. Andrews, into Passamaquoddy Bay and Canada is a mere 45 miles, short by Javelin days. Steve used the excuse that there were showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon forecast to validate the just-post-dawn activity. Besides, we were enveloped in thick fog with the island 50 yards away just outlined by dark trees.

The rest of the morning ablutions were carried out at a reasonable pace. Washing up, shaving, and awaiting Mel's perfect blend of Polcari's decaf and regular grind mix to drip through the filter erased any complaints. Rick declared cereal for breakfast with the caveat that no one could go on deck (i.e. start departure) until the last of the bananas were eaten -- we feared they would not be welcomed by Canadian Customs.

Thus fortified, Steve, after setting the day's route in the Northstar GPS, took Paul and surged on deck to drop and stow the riding sail, then set the colors. Rick readied the laptop with a new daily track and built a route to St. Andrews. The Northstar GPS drives the autopilot - where the boat goes. But, with the GPS position repeated on the laptop, it can quickly be seen on the screen where we are on the chart. If the boat icon isn't following the route on the laptop, it's a quick signal to check for the source of the difference.

By 0643 (Eastern Daylight Time) Brian & Paul had the anchor up and we poked into the fog. We went into our usual "fog mode" with Rick watching the computer and the main radar on at the navigation station below, Mel watching the radar repeater in the cockpit, Steve at the helm, and Brian & Paul as human lookouts. No vessel traffic showed up as we worked our way out into Grand Manan Passage and aimed the bow at Canadian waters.

Nothing on the radar all the way up. We checked in with Fundy Vessel Traffic on channel 14 as we entered Canadian waters at West Quoddy Head. We checked out with channel 14 as we rounded East Quoddy Head at the tip of Campobello Island, and then in again on channel 12 for the inland waters.

Just as we rounded East Quoddy, Brian had to dodge right to avoid a whale at the same time a tour boat was spinning to go astern of us to follow the whale. All we saw was the water whirl, a big spout and a diving fluke as we rounded the point. With a big ebb tide running, we stayed west in the Indian River passage which dropped the ebb against us from 2+ knots to a little under 1 knot.

The route called Western Passage into Passamaquoddy Bay begins at the confluence of waters from the Atlantic Ocean, Cobscook Bay and Passamaquoddy. This junction, just off Eastport, Maine, is called the Sow, described as one of the largest whirlpools in the world. Max currents can reach 7 knots on occasion, and its name comes from it's ability to spin off smaller whirlpools - piglets. We rounded Deer Island Point into Western Passage against about 2 knots of current and headed north for St. Andrews.

True to form, with a favorable 13 knot wind, Steve called for the jib to be rolled out. Noted in the log at 1157. The next log entry reported rolling in the jib -- at 1200; wind gone light. We settled for roast beef sandwiches as we powered across a flat calm Passamaquoddy Bay and into St. Andrews at 1309.

We were met by a dock hand who directed us to a mooring, and even held up the lines for us to grab. We were secure by 1324. The dock hand waited while Steve called Canadian Customs, and, after giving names, birth dates, citizenship, and a report on ship's stores, they granted us a clearance number which was duly noted in the log. Formalities completed at 1330 Eastern Daylight time, we headed ashore, where it was 1430 Atlantic Daylight time. What a difference a dinghy ride makes!

This was the new dinghy's inaugural passage. With Paul at the helm of the electric Torqeedo motor, Brian & Mel were safely ferried ashore. Returning to get Rick & Steve, it completed a second trip to much praise from the crew.

St. Andrews was laid out in 1783 by Loyalists escaping from the rebellious Americans at Castine, Maine. Several houses were actually moved from Castine to St. Andrews. The downtown is laid out in a neat grid pattern, and the main wharf (run by the wharfinger) is, appropriately, at the foot of King Street. Now mostly a tourist town, the action is on Water Street, for about two blocks either side of King.

We walked the lot, and up the hill to the Fairmont Algonquin - a fine old wooden establishment. We tried to have a drink on the balcony, but it was full and rain seemed to be fast approaching. We were given a great list of options by a local, and headed back "downtown". We checked out the Red Herring, Kennedy Place, Georgiana's Tea Room, Europa, and finally settled at Lobster Bay. Brian treated the crew to a round of beer, and Rick did dinner - Fish & Chips for all but Steve who settled for soup and a lobster roll.

During dinner, the fog was so thick we couldn't see across the harbor, but by the time we finished we could easily see Javelin on her mooring. Again the little engine that could - did, and we were safely back aboard before the fog rolled in again. With fog condensation dripping from the rigging, Steve and Paul were driven below from their reading in the cockpit. Steve declared defeat, and, setting a new record, signaled slumbering bliss with sonorous sounds at 6:47 pm Eastern Daylight time. (We could give him a little break and say it was 7:47 Atlantic Daylight time.)

Rick worked on the log. Brian continued work on installing an updated version of Nobeltec navigation software on a spare computer. Mel curled up with a paper book, Paul with his Kindle. Once again, movies were postponed.

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Stowing riding sail
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0640 FOG ...
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land?
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Mel on radar watch ...
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Steve checks Otto ...
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Paul's lookout ...
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Radar says land ...
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GPS does too.
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Campobello Island ...
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north end ...
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East Quoddy Head
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We found it!
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One fine light
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Head boat ...
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spinning to ...
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watch whales.
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A lookout.
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Threading our way ...
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Tucked in wharf ...
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on the chart ...
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Avoiding current ...
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Deer Island Ferry ...
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makes beach landings
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Deer Island light
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Turning the corner
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Approach to
St. Andrews
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narrow channel ...
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old harbor light ...
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needs bulkhead repair
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out bound boat ...
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fisherman astern ...
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This is ...
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shallow!
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The whole harbor
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Only dock ...
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local fleet ...
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St. Andrews
Yacht Club
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our mooring awaits ...
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downtown
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Going ashore ...
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first passengers ...
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sure does ...
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look small!
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Riding nicely.
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Make room!
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Long climb up
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View from dock ...
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still there.
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Checking in
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Tide's out ...
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tide's in.
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Tide's out ...
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tide's in.
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King St. murals ...
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are well done
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Looks like ...
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All Saints.
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Shopping anyone?
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Mel & Brian walking ...
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to Algonquin Hotel.
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Here's where we ...
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had dinner.
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Historic layout ...
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and history.
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Back to the dock.


Go To Log Summary

Friday, August 6th

Friday morning dawned clear and bright revealing St. Andrews in a much more favorable light. Steak and and eggs, using the last of our steak dinner, got the crew off to a good start. Paul rigged the dinghy with the Torqeedo and ferried Rick ashore. While Rick camped out on the back entrance of the library to upload the log to the web page, Paul toured the town in the morning light. They rendezvoused on the main wharf about 0915 and returned to Javelin on her mooring.

With dinghy stowed, and with Rick at the helm, we dropped the mooring and threaded the channel south into Passamaquoddy Bay. It was a glorious day for sailing and we started off with main and jib headed west toward US waters at a roaring 9.5 knots in 12 knots of breeze. It didn't take long to reach the US - Canadian border, which we could tell because ahead there was a distinct line of lobster pots paralleling the shore. The Canadian lobster season ends on the last Friday in June so there were none on the Canadian side of the line.

We tacked back toward the center of the Bay, and after rounding the long point extending south from St. Andrews, headed north for Chamcook Harbor. This big space is formed by Minister Island, and is reached through a narrow channel at it's north end. At the south end, cars drive to Minister Island during the last two hours of low tide. But, with 20' of tide, it's really an island most of the time. We furled the jib and motor sailed in and out of the harbor.

From below, Rick laid out a course northeast across open water to explore the northern edge of the Bay. But, what looked to be clear sailing on the chart was strewn with fish pens. We weaved around them, passed a Canadian Coast Guard vessel headed south, and tacked down wind toward Digdeguash Basin. This picturesque spot could be reached either side of Long Island. We chose the shallower, but wider side to the east and sailed in, rail down. Before us was yet another idyllic anchorage to be saved for another day. Nowhere along the top of the bay did we see a single cruising sailboat or power boat.

Turning south, we eased past the mouth of the Magaguaeavic River, another place with perfectly protected anchorages. While Rick & Paul were mixing a tuna salad for sandwiches below, Rick heard a "boink" on deck. An inspection found a 2" long, 1/4 inch diameter bolt - not something you want to find falling from the rigging. An inspection with binoculars found that the mast end of the lower full length batten was no longer in its slide on the mast, and the most likely source of the bolt.

We ate our lunch as we sailed slowly south. A mile from the Letite Passage out of Passamaquoddy we lowered the main until we could reach the lower batten. The bolt fit exactly into the batten and it's slide, but we didn't have the nut on the lower side to secure it. We lowered and furled the main and headed for Letite Passage.

Letite Passage is the northern entrance for water into Passamaquoddy Bay. The Maine Guide reads, "The huge tides (up to 27') pull huge volumes of water through some tight spots, and the resulting currents are a force to be reckoned with. ... The eddies, boils and whirlpools in the approaches to Passamaquoddy Bay are unlike anything encountered elsewhere on the coast of Maine. At full strength, they reach 8 knots and may make your boat yaw violently or even spin you around in a circle. ... Sailing through Letite with a strong flood current is an exhilarating experience. the shore moves by at an alarming rate and quick decisions are required. ... Fighting against the ebb is a losing proposition." We traversed this treacherously described two mile passage as the ebb turned to flood as easily as you please, almost disappointed that there was nothing to report back home. (Note: The charts and the Northstar GPS spell the passage as above, but the "Maine Guide" spells the passage "Letete".)

Always on the lookout for places to explore, Rick picked the long estuary into Back Bay, though panned for its commercial fish plant near its mouth, the goal was "the real gem of Back Bay is the incredibly deep gut at the north end of the bay that leads to an almost completely landlocked, three-armed gunkhole, home to herons, eagles and seals." The book lied. Fish pens, many well worn, clogged the narrow, but 60' deep passage all the way to the "gunkhole". Unintentionally, it was actually correctly named because it had now been filled with "gunk". A listing house, dilapidated dock, and ugly fish pen smack in the middle was our reward for this five mile detour.

Much better luck awaited as we headed the last eight miles for the day into Letang Harbor. Again totally protected from any sea swells, Letang is tucked back as a basin at the mouth of a river. There are at least three excellent spacious anchorages to choose from and we were neatly anchored in the southeastern one by 1600. Again, not a cruiser in sight, and here, no fishing boats either. The lush evergreen forest crept to waters edge on all the rocky hills, with elevations sufficient to mitigate most winds. We had even seen two seals on the way in. This is what we came for.

With the riding sail set, we went to work on chores. Below, Mel & Steve cleaned the screens for the dorade vents - a much needed breath of fresh air. Rick & Brian, with inputs from Steve tackled the batten car bolt and nut issue. We wrapped the main halyard around the bulk of the slides to lift them enough to work on the 4th slide. It took several tries to find a nut that would fit the bolt, but they were too big in diameter to fit into the recess in the bottom of the slide. While Brian held the nut with the bolt in a vise grip pliers, Rick filed off the points of the nut until it could be squeezed into the hole. Then, with a bit of pulling and twisting, the bolt was slipped through the end of the batten and turned tight in the car. Mission accomplished.

During evening libations the afternoon cumulus darkened and solidified. No sooner had Steve again performed as Grill Master with large pieces of boneless chicken, cooking them to perfection, when a heavy shower covered the anchorage. It lasted right through dinner, then passed on. Paul chose "The Usual Suspects" as our first movie of the cruise. Yet again, we were tucked in our bunks before 10.

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Rick takes her out
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Great day ...
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sailing on ...
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Passamaquoddy Bay
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Headed for ...
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Chamcook Hbr ...
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cautious approach ...
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small marks ...
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chart looks clear ...
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lots of fish ...
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pens in the way ...
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big things too!
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Canadian CG
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Hog Island
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Into Digdeguash Basin

Digdeguash Basin - Passamaquoddy Bay




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Letite Passage out ...
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looks like this ...
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Greens Point light ...
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Morgan Ledge
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both lined up
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Brian reads to us
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Back side of Greens Light
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Into Back Bay ...
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lots of rocks ...
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and fish pens.
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Largest Sardine Cannery
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Roaring Bull light
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Approaching Letang
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We're here!
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Totally alone
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a beautiful place.
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Nut job ...
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by Rick & Brian
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will it go in?
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Yes!
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Brian tightens ...
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Mission accomplished.


Go To Log Summary

Saturday, August 7th

Crystal clear and crisp. A great way to start the day. All hands were up by 0700; oatmeal done by 0745; under way at 0748. It could not have been better weather for today's plan. On the trip east, we had fog and 4-6' seas. Even in Passamaquoddy Bay, we had periods of fog. Today Grand Manan stood majestically on the horizon, 15 miles out to sea. The solitary Wolf Islands, east of Letang, were a short detour along the route. Starting out in 10 -12 knots of breeze, the crew debated adding "35 -35" to our day's plan. "35 - 35" refers to 44 degrees 35 minutes north latitude, and 66 degrees 35 minutes west longitude. This spot, about five miles southest of the southeast corner of Grand Manan was reported to be rich with whales feeding. The attraction apparently is the sharp dropoff from the underwater shelf extending south from Grand Manan along the deep trench of the bay of Fundy. The massive tides would be sweeping nutrients, and dinner, on and off the shelf twice a day.

While we debated, the whales had their own idea and 2-3 surfaced around Javelin even before we reached the Wolves. We saw about a dozen sightings and got one picture - with a spout no less. We added "35 - 35" as a destination, and an additional 20 miles to our day's plan.

The west wind, on which we had departed, faded when we rounded the Wolves. As boat speed droped to 4 knots, we contemplated Hank Jonas' prediction of wind when there were sheep in the meadow. The meadow being the blue sky to windward, and the sheep being small puffy cumulus clouds. But, being the pundits we aspire to be, we speculated that in this instance were these really wolves in sheeps' clothing (given our location next to the Wolf Islands.) Perhaps in sympathy, or maybe disgust, the wind filled in with a vengence. First from the southwest, then veered to the west.

Nothing is more glorious the Javelin close reaching in a fair breeze and smooth sea. Our course took us south on the east side of Grand Manan, in the lee of the west-southwesterly winds. With the ebb current flowing out of Fundy, our boat speed of 9.6 knots translated to 12.4 knots over the bottom at one point. Sparkling waves, blue skies and a few white cumulus for contrast -it was perfect sailing.

Just as we closed with 35 - 35 there was a Pan Pan call on the radio from the W. B. Scott, a 42' boat that had lost it's engine and was drifting about 3 miles southeast of Grand Manan. As they described their situation to Fundy Coast Guard, we noted their position and headed toward them - they were about 3 miles northwest of us at the time. We heard a call from Rolling Stone that they were picking up the Scott, and we thought we could see them a little over 2 miles ahead. Sailing at better than 9 knots we slowly closed with the pair and eventually passed them a little over an hour later. By then we were all just over 3 miles from Head Harbor on Grand Manan.

Head Harbor is totally man made by three docks. A big, new concrete dock serves the ferry that runs several times a day back to Blacks Harbor. Next to it was an old wooded ferry dock, and west of that a "T" shaped massive structure with pilings and concrete which houses the fishing fleet. This is a serious working harbor and rough, seaworthy, steel vessels are tied several boats deep along every inch of dock front.

We found one very nice dock space on a float and tied up. In minutes we learned that the fishing fleet, at least 4 or 5 strong would be coming in later in the evening and tying up outside of us if we stayed here. We quickly moved to raft up outside a 50' cruiser, and hardly had we gotten all secure, when a J/42 named Juliet came in and rafted alongside us. (Their dinghy was named Row-me-ow.)

Paul & Mel headed off to walk the one-road town, while Rick & Brian found ice at the near by Sailors Landing. We noted they have both Wi-Fi and ice cream in addition to serving meals. The glorious sunny afternoon clouded up and the Fundy wind whistled across the harbor. We closed up the ports and turned on the generator and heating system to bring the temperature up to 70 degrees for dinner.

We invited Rick & Sherry Tonge from the J/42 aboard for cocktails and a spaghetti & meatballs dinner. They brought their own drinks - Sherry a Dark & Stormy, which endeared her to the crew - plus she baked a fresh batch of delicious fudge brownies. We finished off the evening with a movie, Blood Diamond, and even sang a few songs from the DCYC song book.

Again it was an early evening, a cool night and good sleeping.

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Saturday morning...
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in Letang Harbor ...
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is beautiful ...
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more fish pens.
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Out to sea ...
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Grand Manan @ 15 mi.
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Whale ho!
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Grand Manan ferry ...
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heading out.
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Approaching Eastern Wolf
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nice sailing
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at the cove ...
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beware the rock ...
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sneaky ...
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fish nets too.
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Rugged shore.
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Rail down ...
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heeled over ...
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Rick's cooking soup!
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Brian at the helm
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Javelin at her best
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Headed for 35 - 35
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Sword boat
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Picture perfect
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Chasing Pan Pan
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We'll find them ...
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W. B. Scott tow
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catching them ...
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disabled Scott.
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Picture takers

Great Sailing in Bay of Fundy


Grand Manan Tow




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Speed sailing ...
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great fun
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Great Duck light
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Grand Manan track
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House boat ...
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party ...
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all happy ...
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tow line ...
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ashore.
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The bay
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Harbor entrance
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all man-made
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Cozy place
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First dock position
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was nice
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In the raft
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Black mast ...
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stands out
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Rick & Sherry


Go To Log Summary

Sunday, August 8th

All night the wind bruised Head Harbor with a train of wavelets that smacked and tapped on Javelin's stern. It was like white noise and not at all annoying. We all slept in until close to 7:30, with no big challenge ahead for the day. Rick collected camera cards from Mel & Paul to get pictures of Grand Manan and started the log update.

Paul suggested we go to the Sailors Landing, at the head of the ferry dock, for breakfast. After a brief discussion if this was "to give the cook a break", or "to get away from the cook's food", we headed for breakfast. It was a popular locals spot, with about a dozen tables filled and the food was good, if the service was a bit slow. The crew returned to the boat shortly after 9:00, while Rick stayed behind to finish adding pictures to the log and uploading the files on the Landings' WiFi system.

Back aboard just before 10:30, Steve had the engine running, and after waiting for a whale watching boat to leave, we were under way at 1039. Our original Plan for the day was a sail back around East Quoddy Head and Campobello Island down into Cosbcook Bay, even though Cobscook is in US waters. We decided to swap destinations and go to Harbor De Lute, originally Monday's destination, even though it's a really short run.

The whale watching boat headed for the north end of Grand Manan and we followed -- it's along our course anyway. We spotted a whale astern of us, and then another near the whale watcher. Though it was cloudy, the wind was strong from the south - southwest and Javelin blasted along toward the towering cliffs at the head of Grand Manan at 9 knots, making 11 knots over the bottom.

Also ahead, and stretching far to the north over the barrier islands that form Passamaquoddy Bay, was a towering bank of white fog. Steve called for the "Lectrasan" and within minutes we were charging through thick fog. When Javelin was made, the standard electrical panel came with a breaker for a "Lectrasan", an electric toilet system, an option never installed. But the breaker was there and the ships radar was connected to it. Thus the call.

It was about 8 miles from the start of the fog to East Quoddy Head, and the wind built to 23 knots and we charged along at 10 - 11 knots, covering the distance in less than an hour. We spotted one boat on radar and adjusted course to avoid it. As we closed with the land, a series of targets appeared on the radar screen and from their movements, we suspected they were whale watching boats. A mile from the light, the fog cleared and there were a small fleet of 5 or 6 boats milling around looking for whales. We spotted one between us and shore and even managed to get a picture of it - most likely a Minke whale.

Now in bright sun and wind moderated by the land, we rounded Quoddy Head and sailed close hauled up Head Passage. The outgoing tide boiled over rock ledges, and our 8 knot boat speed was only good enough for 4.5knots over the bottom in places. We spotted one more whale, and were surrounded by a pod of dolphins for about ten minutes. A few tacks and an hour later we were already at Eastport. We tacked and ran with wind and current back to the entrance to Harbor De Lute in a quick 15 minutes.

Harbor De Lute is a bight into the west side of Campobello Island about 2/3 of the way to the northern end. It's about half a mile in, and runs a mile and a half south. However, the last mile has only 1 or 2 feet of water, or dries completely at low tide. When the 20' tide is in, it looks more like an inland lake but whoa to the boat that lingers too long!

Anchored at the early hour of 1423, the crew finished up splicing the lashing lines for the dinghy and adjusting the latches on the forward hatch. Then it was reading and log time. The new awning shaded Paul and Brian stretched out on the cockpit benches, while Steve, Mel and Rick read below.

After our hearty breakfast ahsore, and sandwiches at 1300, cocktails and dinner were pushed back and the pork chops came off the grill about 7:30. The evening movie was "Fargo", and this time it was Brian and rick who dozed off along the way.

[Click to enlarge]
Swallow Tail light ...
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from north side
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Grand Manan head
& Fog bank
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Birds on cliffs
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Whale watchers
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Whale ho!
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Fish pens entering ...
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Harbor De Lute
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a very pretty ...
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place ...
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to anchor.
[Click to enlarge]
All secure.


Go To Log Summary

Monday, August 9th

A cold southwest wind whistled through Harbor De Lute as we hauled anchor at 0844 bound for Eastport and US Custom clearance back into US jurisdiction. Whirlpools and current rips fed by the Fundy flood tide churned the waters of Friar Roads as we made our way south. There was a scant 50' of dock space behind the head boat schooner at the customs dock, and Steve laid Javelin alongside with precision. So tight was the fit that our bow and forestay were actually overlapped inside the aft end of the schooners' main boom.

Heeding the sign at the head of the dock, Steve took our passports and walked up to the Customs station just a short way down the street from the head of the dock. Fifteen minutes later, a white Border Patrol SUV appeared on the dock above Javelin and two officers stepped out and requested that the remaining four of us come out into the cockpit. We mustered as requested and they said thanks and headed back to the house and Steve. Five minutes later, we were cleared back into the US.

Eastport, particularly at 9:45 on a gray morning with a stiff breeze and a threat of rain, was pretty quiet. Steve, Rick & Paul walked the long block up hill away from the waterside downtown, and then two long blocks further to reach a well stocked, and friendly supermarket to get a few fresh veggies. They emerged to a wet pavement, and a block later it was raining hard. Taking shelter on the front porch of a church to save their heads and soles, the shower passed in about ten minutes. Back down the hill, Rick took the purchases back aboard, while Steve & Paul checked out the local hardware store for lamp oil and a pin for the anchor bolt. At 11:04 we cast off and headed for Cobscook Bay.

This treasure had never been on Javelin's radar before, and it is seldom visited by cruises - much to their loss and our gain. While it is totally in US waters, you have to go 15 miles up and around Campobello Island, in Canadian waters, to get to it if you can't get under the 47' clearance bridge at Lubec. Though a rain shower passed just across our bow as we entered Cobscook, we managed to explore without getting wet. Working counter clockwise around the Bay, we stuck our bow into Sipp Cove, made a U turn around a rock, and aimed for the Pennamaquan River. With just over 18' of tide it looked more like a big bay than a river, though we paid close attention to the green cans that marked what would have been a very narrow entrance at low tide.

The morning project had been to re-mark the anchor rode at 50' intervals. Even permanent magic marker fades in salt water and sun, so Paul, Mel and Brian set to work with a more robust system. At each interval they "hockled" the line, twisting the strands temporarily backwards to wrap black electrical tape around each strand. The 50' mark got 1 set of tape on each of the three strands, the 100' point got 2 sets, the 150' mark 3, and the 200' point got 4. The hockles were then untwisted leaving a well-marked point in the line which was easy to see as the anchor was going down. They finished just in time to try it out as we dropped the anchor at the upper reaches of the Pennamaquan for lunch.

Thwarted in our initial cruise goal of the Reversing Falls at St. John, we next explored a smaller version at Falls Island. The cruising guide suggests this is best done ----- by car. A six mile long chain of bays empties about 20' of tide around Falls Island through two passages - one 7 Javelin boat lengths wide, the other 10. It is described in the guide as a whitewater rapids at full flow. The outflow surrounds Falls Island and emerges into Cobscook Bay between Leighton Point and Denbow Neck at a spot about a quarter mile wide. A mile out, at Wilson Ledges, Javelin entered swirling boils and whirlpools. We aimed directly for the opening and worked our way in. The currents were impressive and when we decided safety outweighed adventure (as Steve reminded us again of the "Keels & Masts ..." sign), we first slowed the engine until we were making about 3 knots through the water, but visually we were being thrown back away from the land. Putting the engine in neutral, we were carried by the rush of water at 5 knots back toward Wilsons Ledges.

Our destination for the evening was Federal Harbor, a spot created by two Islands and two headlands with an 11 foot spot in the center. It proved to be a good choice, and the weather gods approved too as some sun began to peak out here and there. We anchored on the 11' spot, putting out 45' of chain, plus 100' of line. That would appear to be a depth-to-line scope of 13:1, however, when you add the 22' tide, we were anchoring in 33' feet of water with a scope just over 4 to 1. Add Javelin's 53' of length, and we needed a circle 400' in diameter in which to swing. There was just a bit more than that to the four rock corners of this anchorage.

Paul rigged up the dinghy and the Torqeedo and with Rick as cameraman, headed off to explore the arms of the harbor. The little electric engine pushed us against the ebbing tide nicely past bold granite boulders draped in yellow-green seaweed. Gulls and cormorants picked away at the exposed ledges and pools for an afternoon snack. In one cove we even saw a guy and a gal in waders walking along the exposed bottom. A hail brought back the reply that they were collecting periwinkles.

Steak dinner on the grill was good. To the east, the white gauze of fog filtered the trees and crept along the north shore of Cobscook Bay. Paul, for the first time ever, offered up a dud of a movie - Blindness.

[Click to enlarge]
Monday departure ...
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current rips ...
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approaching Eastport
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dock space ...
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do what it says ...
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US Coast Guard.
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now cleared into US.
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Commercial side
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Eastport's water side...
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street side ...
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shopping side.
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Big stuff
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Cobscook Bay
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looked damp ...
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prepared for wet
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Clement Pt.
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Into Sipp Bay
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Anchor rode marks
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get a grin
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Working up forward
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Nice house ...
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and anchorage ...
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with ramp.
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Pennamaquan River
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Osprey nest & ...
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osprey.
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Approaching Falls Island
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whirlpools & ...
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boils.
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5 knot currents

Falls Island Current




[Click to enlarge]
Leighton Point
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Into Federal Harbor ...
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it's a cross roads
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Hog Island
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Black Head
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Long Island
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Chart view
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Leaving to explore
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fine lines ...
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bye guys ...
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at Hog Island
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Horan Head &
Hog I.
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great shore ...
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weathered rock &
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rock falls, &
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caves.
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Fills at high tide ...
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drying out ...
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tucked in ...
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great rock ...
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civilization ...
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humans too, ...
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getting periwinkles.
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Headed back ...
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good view ...
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ready to go.
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Steve takes a spin.
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Our day of play.
[Click to enlarge]
Great sunset.


Go To Log Summary

Tuesday, August 10th

Maybe it was the movie. "Blindness", a white version where only an orange orb of sun could be seen, marked the morning. We knew we were within 300' of land in four directions, and faintly the darker shades revealed trees and rocks exposed by the minus 2.4' tide. Going into our standard "fog mode" we departed Federal Harbor at 0633, bound one last time north through Canadian waters around Campobello Island and back to US Atlantic Ocean waters.

Safely around East Quoddy Head headed south, with big drops of condensation falling from the rigging and a penetrating dampness in the air, the crew was treated to an 0900 cup of hot chocolate with whipped cream and a single Oreo.

It was an uneventful passage, though slowed by the flood current, all the way down to Cross Island. Visibility improved slowly, then dramatically cleared as we crossed through the Cross Island anchorage into Machais Bay. By the time we'd finished our lunch sandwiches, we were across Machias and headed into Bucks Harbor to get Eastern Atlantic Lobster company's signature product. We filled the starboard fuel tank at the same time, and were rushed off the dock as lobster boats were arriving to unload their day's catch.

A sea breeze had filled in, and true to form, Skipper Steve itched to make sail and set us free to romp to windward. Rick begged at least a quick poke into Clamshell cove, the original Plan Anchorage just north of Buck's Harbor. Reluctantly Steve allowed nine minutes, and under power we nosed into Clamshell, declarded it was possible, if not a must-try, and headed back into Machias Bay.

We made sail at 1340, with a southwest wind at 10 knots. Steve said, "Who wants to sail?" Rick was the first to respond and soon had the speed up over 7 knots as the wind increased to 12 knots. Close hauled, we worked our way "west" as everyone says. We tacked at Cross Island, then again at Stone Island, again at Libby Island, and finally Ram Island. Now clear into the ocean, we tacked west again. Paul was now at the helm with the ebb current now pushing us at up to 10 knots over the bottom with 15 knots of wind.

Rick was plotting the coure and advised that with just a few more degrees to windward we could clear Misery Ledge. Steve's attention peaked. We were sailing in 150' of water, two and a half miles southwest of Libby Island. After a scan of his hand-held GPS, he remarked, "That Misery ledge?" Sure enough a tiny spot of rock poked to within 14' of the surface directly ahead, not a navigation mark for at least a mile in any direction. Two inches of trim on the jib and a bit of concentration later we slid safely past the ledge.

At Black Rocks, again well out in open water, but these well marked, we tacked south. The radio crackled with, "Coast Guard, this is Spirit." Several attempts trying to switch and answer on channel 22, which Spirit would get to, say "Spirit, Spirit," not get a reply and go back to channel 16 just before the CG, which had asked Spirit to go to 22, finally came up and tried to hail her. We had one radio on channel 16 and one on 22 so we heard both sides of the comedy. The CG determined that Sprit couldn't get to 22 and carried out most of the conversation on 16. Once a connection was made, Spirit reported she was in Lakeman Harbor and, along with a kayak, had been hit and damaged by a lobster boat. We were half in stitches listening to the CG's next questions: -- "How many people on board? Are they wearing their PFDs?" (personal floatation devices, more simply known as life jackets), and our favorites, "What color is your boat? What is your documentation or registration number?" Oh yes, about 15 minutes later they asked if anyone was injured, and a bit later still, they asked if they had the name of the lobster boat. During this conversation there were some bursts of conversation which at first didn't seem to fit anything. Then we realized it was the lobster boat adding comments. The most repeated ones were, "I was just trying to warn them they were in the wrong place," or "I was just telling them about a high wind warning for tomorrow." (Of which we had heard nothing and could not find later.) When the CG finally asked for the lobster boat's name and number, if they had it, the lobster boat tried to transmit over Spirit's reply to drown it out. The CG requested the lobster boat to stay on scene, but he kept saying he would be on his mooring (if they could find it!).

There was at least some truth from the lobsterman, the weather forecast now added achance of showers and thunderstorms. This changed our anchorage decision from the entrance to Mud Hole, which is open to the north, to Mistake Harbor which is protected from all directions, particularly north and east. We bore away and raced into the channel at Moose Peak light and dropped sail in the calm between the rocky shores.

No sooner had we dropped the anchor, at 1624, when Mast Transit, Bob & Mary Ann Miller's Mason 44, rounded up into Mistake to join us. Bob had been Steve's CFO at one time, and, more importantly, was the guy that suggested Steve should consider getting a J-160. We had already planned to meet them tomorrow for dinner - which is why we had 7 big lobsters in the fridge. They came aboard for cocktails and headed back to their boat for dinner as clouds thickened to the northwest.

Our second Paul's lasagana dinner, with veggies, was delicious, and we turned in without even a movie.

[Click to enlarge]
Where's the anchor?
[Click to enlarge]
in the fog ...
[Click to enlarge]
rocks too
[Click to enlarge]
Fog drill ...
[Click to enlarge]
radar watch ...
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GPS watch ...
[Click to enlarge]
log watch.
[Click to enlarge]
0900 reward.
[Click to enlarge]
Clearing at Cutler
[Click to enlarge]
Yellow Head
[Click to enlarge]
Eastern Atlantic
Lobster Co.
[Click to enlarge]
Getting lobsters
and fuel
[Click to enlarge]
Going to windward ...
[Click to enlarge]
Paul's turn.
[Click to enlarge]
in Mistake Harbor
[Click to enlarge]
Mast Transit
Bob & Mary Ann Miller
[Click to enlarge]
Coming aboard ...
[Click to enlarge]
Bob too.
[Click to enlarge]
Weather approaching ...
[Click to enlarge]
breeze too.
[Click to enlarge]
Evening ...
[Click to enlarge]
dinghy ride.
[Click to enlarge]
Quiet ...
[Click to enlarge]
looking fast.


Go To Log Summary

Wednesday, August 11th

The rain went through quickly last night, leaving a sparkling morning with a north wind kissing the dark blue waters around Mistake. Even setting colors at 0800 it was apparent that this would be a major sun screen day. Bob & Mary Ann came aboard to discuss the day's route. Our plan was Stave Harbor, up Frenchman's Bay and across from Bar Harbor. They had not been there, and were game to try a new location.

The anchor cleared the water at 0939 and we followed Mast Transit out of Mistake. A pod of dolphins was jumping and feeding while a flock of birds circled and dove for fish flushed to the surface. With 13 knots of wind, we set the main and spinnaker at 1000 and dashed off at 9 knots toward the west southwest. We took pictures of Mast Transit, who had set her chute too, as best we could against the morning sun.

Alas, the forecast was proving all too correct as the wind went both light and around toward the northeast. Chute down and engine on at 1044. We powered past Petit Manan Light and on to Schoodic Point where we turned up into Frenchman's Bay. Steve was itching to sail, and though his prediction of a southwest sea breeze didn't work out, a light northwest wind just rippled the water.

With winds ranging from 7 to 9 knots Javelin slowly built speeds to within a knot and a half of the wind speed. At one point we were doing 7.1 knots on 7.7 knots of wind. What with likely wind speed differences in the 75' between the water and top of our mast, they are just fun numbers. While we were beating north, Mast Transit, following several miles behiind us, did pick up a sea breeze and ride it right up the Bay.

We had worked to the west side and stalled there as the northwester died. Mast Transit sailed up the east side and passed us a little north of Egg Rock. When the sea breeze finally reached us, Steve & Rick simultaneously said, "Let's set the chute." Like a racing crew we were determined to catch the 44' upstart that has gotten ahead of us. At first things looked promising, but as we crossed behind Ironbound Island the wind switched back north and blew the spinnaked against the mast. We even used the engine briefly to reposition Javelin so we could even try to get the sail down. Meanwhile, Mast Transit had gybed along the far shore and had a nice angle for Halibut Hole. Declaring defeat, we dropped the chute and powered up. We caught Mast Transit just past Halibut Hole and congratulated them on a job well done.

A short run into Stave Harbor finished the day, and we were anchored at 1618. Bob provided dinghy service to Mast Transit for cocktails at 1800, and then the whole gang came back to Javelin for a lobster dinner, finished off with a songfest.

[Click to enlarge]
Wednesday morning
[Click to enlarge]
Mast Transit ...
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leads out of Mistake.
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Moose Peak Light
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Mast Transit ...
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riding a roller
[Click to enlarge]
Great ride ...
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heading west.
[Click to enlarge]
No wind at
Petit Manan Light
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Ironbound I. has ...
[Click to enlarge]
great rocks.
[Click to enlarge]
She slips past us!
[Click to enlarge]
Trying to catch up ...
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only under power!
[Click to enlarge]
Well done!
[Click to enlarge]
Frenchman fun.
[Click to enlarge]
Group shot ...
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dinner's ready ...
[Click to enlarge]
let's eat!
[Click to enlarge]
Sunset at Stave Hbr.


Go To Log Summary

Thursday, August 12th

Generally a chores day. Our log entry departing Stave Harbor showed winds speed at "0.0". But, we had a beautiful view of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Mark on Mt. Desert Island. At 1530' it's not much as mountains go, but it is the highest point on the US east coast that rises from the water. A local boast is that the sun first hits the US at the top of Cadillac Mountain.

Our planned course was a short 13 miles into Northeast Harbor for much needed laundry and reprovisioning and uploading of our web page. By the time we were at the Lewis Rock entrance the wind had picked up to the 10 -12 range, and Steve was itching to sail. We continued on in toward NE Harbor.

The New York Yacht Club's annual cruise was in Northeast Harbor, scheduled to depart today. With over 100 participating boats spread among NE Harbor, Southwest Harbor, Seal Cove and at various morrings and at anchor, there were lots of big boats to see. There were times that even 53' Javelin felt small. The pictures below give you an idea of the mix of boats.

We knew we were a bit early, finally arriving off the town dock about 1045 The word was that departure time was 1100, and check-in time was going to be 1200. Now that the wind was up, sailing was a good way to kill some time. We gracefully circled Mast Transit, who had come over earlier and gotten a mooring, and picked up Bob and Mary Ann to join us for a sail. Hardly clear of the anchored boats, we set main and jib and bore off for Western Way. Bob was delighted at the helm as Javelin easily streteched her legs and rolled of 9.2 knots on the speedo. We were in company of may NYYC cruise boats that were headed for their next night in Merchant's Row, including a short race that would start on the far side of Bass Harbor bar. A radio hail from the NE Harbor Dockmaster saying our slip was available was all we needed to tack and sail back in. A nice 10 miles of sailing had been added to the day's track.

Tied in our slip by 1245, we had a quick sandwich lunch and set to the various chores. Steve & Paul set to washing down the boat. Rick headed for the library for free WiFi access to upload the web page and then make a shopping run at the Pine Tree Market (also nicknamed the "Priceless Tree Market" for their steep summer prices.) Brian & Mell headed for the Chamber of Commerce builidng for their WiFi (not free) to finish updating a newer IBM computer and Nobletec system to replace the 1999 Sony that had been our standby for many years. By late afternoon only the laundry, which filled all 8 dryers in the cellar beneath the Pine Tree Market, needed to be folded and taken back aboard.

The crew decided on the Main Sail restaurant, attached to the motel next to the harbor, for dinner. We had to wait a bit before departing because Steve was still polishing the stantions and other stainless bits, and needed a shower before dinner. Dockside, we joked, we were again a "condominium", with our electric power and unlimited water available. A recurring problem was the 110 volt side of our refrigeration system which keeps blowing the circuit breaker on the panel. It worked, after some fiddling on Thursday evening, but was not by Friday morning.

It was just after 9 pm when we got back to the boat, and all turned in for a good night's sleep.

[Click to enlarge]
Cadillac Mountain
Acadia Nation Park
Mt. Dessert Island
[Click to enlarge]
viewed from Seal Hbr
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New York YC ...
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cruise boats ...
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head out ...
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bear away ...
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big stuff ...
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big crowd ...
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some sail ...
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buddied up ...
[Click to enlarge]
another J boat ...
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pretty Concordia ...
[Click to enlarge]
strange mix ...
[Click to enlarge]
some at anchor ...
[Click to enlarge]
grand old lady ...
[Click to enlarge]
thar she blows!
[Click to enlarge]
Dock pileup ...
[Click to enlarge]
NYYC Commodore's flag.


Go To Log Summary

Friday, August 13th

Our early bed time resulted in an early rising. The crew was up by 7 and finished off a cereal breakfast with fresh strawberries, bananas and raisins. A few chores, emails and log uploads filled the morning until some wind filled in.

Away from the dock at 1028, we set sail just outside the harbor, and tacked out Western way. Bob Johnstone, the founder, with his brother, of J Boats, came alongside to say hello. Then we set the chute and tacked down wind past Greening Island and then on into Somes Sound.

Somes Sound is the only deep water fjord in the US, and it cuts four miles north into Mt. Desert Island just to the east of Northeast Harbor. The challenge is that it's only a quarter mile wide at it's narrowest, and never more than half a mile wide. In most place you can sail within a boat length of the rocks and still have over 40' of water. The wind tends to funnel through it, making it a beat in one direction and a run in the other. Today we carried the spinnaker all the way in, gybing twice along the way. Then we tacked ten times coming back out. With Javelin's electric winches, it's more fun than work!

Back into harbor waters, we sailed south of Sutton Island out to East Bunker and back again, generally making 8+ knots in 9-11 knots of wind. Coming back we sighted Bob & Mary Ann Miller and Mast Transit again, and, of course, gave chase. Lots of pictures both ways. Then we headed back into Northeast Harbor, filled the fuel and water tanks, and awaited Hank Jonas & Rebecca to arrive for cocktails at 1800.

Hank arrived at 1710 and talked over our cruise and his travel for the last week. We gave him a hard time that he had powered On Rush right past us on the way in to Northeast Harbor, even though we had talked on the phone. He and Rebecca were having dinner with friends Bill & Debbie Masters from the power boat Sheer Bliss, which hails from Paul's home port, and was tied up across the dock. When Hank arrived, he brought Bill & Debbie along and we enjoyed a lively conversation on cruising grounds.

They went off to the Red Bird for dinner and we tried, on the recommendation of Bob & Mary Ann, the pizza at the Full Beli Deli, just up and across Sea Street from the Docksider. Their 10" "personal" pizza proved a hit and seemed bigger than 10". We had enough pieces left over to complete a whole one for the doggie box. Yet again, no movie and sack time shortly after 2100.

[Click to enlarge]
Bob Johnstone alongside
[Click to enlarge]
Great spinnaker ...
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sailing ...
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Steve's happy at ...
[Click to enlarge]
9.2 knots.
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Mast Transit ...
[Click to enlarge]
has happy crew ...
[Click to enlarge]
looks great going ...
[Click to enlarge]
and coming.
[Click to enlarge]
Luder 16s racing.

Note: These great pictures of Javelin sailing in Western Way outside Northeast Harbor by Bob Miller arrived too late to get in the numbered sequence. If you are just following the individual pages, you will skip from "Luder 16s racing" directly to "Our day's fun ..." and miss these. To see them click on any one and there is a sequence for these ten pics.

[Click to enlarge]
Morning at Stave Hbr
[Click to enlarge]
Day sail outside
Northeast Harbor
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Alert crew!
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Jib luffing
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Light air ...
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more breeze ...
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even better ...
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at attention ...
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closer ...
[Click to enlarge]
vertical view
[Click to enlarge]
Our day's fun ...
[Click to enlarge]
included
Somes Sound.
[Click to enlarge]
Welcome aboard
Rebecca ...
[Click to enlarge]
joining Paul,
Mel & Steve ...
[Click to enlarge]
plus Bill &
Debbie Masters
[Click to enlarge]
and Hank in the corner.


Go To Log Summary

Saturday, August 14th

"Early to bed, early to rise ...," didn't make us wealthy or wise, but we were (reasonably) happy when we did arise. Rick heard the usual morning noises - head flushing & voices _ and stuck his head out the his door to ask, "Are we really getting up?" "Ah Yup," said Mel. "Humm, it's 5 after 5." "Five minutes late, I guess replied Mel.

We were off the dock at 0524, and enjoyed watching the sun rise as we powered out Western Way. The morning cliches continued with Horace Greely's advice, "Go west young man." With a light southwest wind forecast today, but building southwesters for Sunday and (worse) Monday, it was prudent to get as far west as we could while the going was easy. Our initial plan for the night was Maple Juice Cove, on the St. George River, just west of Penobscot Bay, a still substantial 57 mile run. Our new target was Linekin Bay, next door to Boothbay, a 72 mile run.

Breakfast was served at 0600. Oatmeal with "dead flies." Back at Mistake Harbor we had both finished off the initial supply of raisins and acquired a healthy swarm of flies. The crew took turns bashing them until the cockpit was littered with bodies. The quip was that Rick would sweep them up and substitute them for raisins. Fortunately the Pine Tree Market had come through again and the new raisins were just fine.

A flat sea and almost no wind made for easy going. Dodging the multitude of lobster pots was the morning challenge. We worked out way through Casco Passage, down Merchant Row, and across the bottom of Penobscot Bay past Two Bush Channel. Lunch was the left over pizza.

Paul & Eli rent a cottage for a week or two just down the rocks from New Harbor on the Pemaquid Peninsula. We've talked about sticking Javelin's nose in for years, but it is tiny, and even Paul's assurance that there is a great lobster place - Shaws - was not enough to persuade Steve. One more try today as the wind continued light finally succeeded and we made a 2.5 mile detour into New Harbor. Beautiful? Yes! Tiny? Even smaller than thought. We made a tight circle in front of Shaws, with a deck full of happy eaters and a dock filling a boat with day-trippers to Monhegan Island, about 8 miles to the south east.

The reward for this effort was a bit of wind and we set sail at 1343 in 9.2 knots of breeze. Though hoping it would build as the day warmed, it has stayed light as we beat into 7.8 knots toward the tip of Pemaquid Neck. We continued on tacking twice before a long hitch right in at Ram Island Light when we turned up for Linekin Bay.

A neat and fast dropping of the main was credited to Brian's fine work on the main halyard. It was a straight line under power almost the full length of Linekin to the tiny cove in the northeast corner where Steve had access to a mooring ball. We were tucked in between rocks and the shore with pretty cottages, docks and lawns for a view. Paul's last chili and a green salad served well for dinner, and we watch our last movie for the cruise - the Dirty Dozen.

[Click to enlarge]
Early start.
[Click to enlarge]
Lunch!
[Click to enlarge]
Paul's cottage
(left)
[Click to enlarge]
Other cottages ...
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approaching New Harbor
[Click to enlarge]
Small place ...
[Click to enlarge]
locals loafing ...
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pretty back bay ...
[Click to enlarge]
this is a fine ...
[Click to enlarge]
little harbor.
[Click to enlarge]
Shaws eatery ...
[Click to enlarge]
great Golden ...
[Click to enlarge]
let's go!
[Click to enlarge]
Classic pier.
[Click to enlarge]
Paul's cottage -
left of two.
[Click to enlarge]
Ram Island Light
[Click to enlarge]
Boothbay head boat


Go To Log Summary

Sunday, August 15th

A scrambled egg breakfast started the day. With only 26 miles to go to Harpswell, it was an invitation to use the 8- 10 knot southerly for a full day of sailing. After powering out of Linekin Bay as far as The Cuckolds, we set sail and beat our way west. The wind eventually increased to the 12 - 13 knot range and Javelin cantered across the swells rolling up from the south.

We eased off and ran into Harpswell a little after noon. With 15 knots of wind we were flying through the sea speckled with the rainbow colors of shore to shore lobster pots. When asked about lunch, Rick replied that he'd make sandwichs when the boat was flat. Steve saind, "We'll keep her flat - go make 'em." By the time the pre-lunch condiments of carrots, pickles, olives and radishes were put in a bowl and passed on deck, the paper towel laid on the work surface, the 10 pieces of bread laid out, and the 2 Djionaise, 2 mayo and 1 split spreads squeezed on the bread, Javelin had already gybed once and streaked over in front of the McIlvaine's house. Steve called for a tack. Rounding up at over 9 knots, she, naturally, heeled. Rick grabbed the olive jar and put it in the sink, tucked the mayo jar against the latch of the fridge and generally hoped the 10 pieces of gooey bread would stay put. They did. This exercise happened twice more as Javelin raced back and forth across Harpswell Sound. So much for staying level. No sooner had the sandwiches been passed up and eaten, we crossed the Sound once more and doused sail.

Leighton & Karin arrived home a bit before 4 pm and we all headed ashore to catch up. It was easy on their beautiful deck overlooking Harpswell Sound. While Rick set to work uploading the log, the ret of the gang settled in with nibbles and a toddy on the deck. A gust of wind, not particularly strong, was enough to topple a young, but heavily laded peach tree next to their guest house. The obvious questions from the pictures is, "How many sailors does it take to right a peach tree?"

That mission accomplished, we all piled into Karin's car and drove out Harpswell Neck to Morse's Lobsters. Situated between Harpswell to the east and Potts Harbor, part of Casco Bay, on the west, we had a great view. Throw in some approaching black clouds from the southwest and it made for a great dinner. We returned to Javelin just after 9, and turned in.

[Click to enlarge]
The Cuckolds Light
[Click to enlarge]
Leighton & Karin's
house & guest house
[Click to enlarge]
Javelin at anchor
[Click to enlarge]
Paul's dinghy service
[Click to enlarge]
Peach tree ...
[Click to enlarge]
blown down ...
[Click to enlarge]
re-staked.
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Sunshine
[Click to enlarge]
It must ...
[Click to enlarge]
have been ...
[Click to enlarge]
time to ...
[Click to enlarge]
call home!
[Click to enlarge]
Nice smile!
[Click to enlarge]
Deck talk ...
[Click to enlarge]
for all ...
[Click to enlarge]
Jonathon Livingston
[Click to enlarge]
watches Javelin
[Click to enlarge]
Beautiful day.


Go To Log Summary

Monday, August 16th

The predicted rain started about 0420 according to Mel. We were up at 0500 and finally under way at 0549, thanks to having to wash a lot of mud off the 50' of anchor chain.

Our 55.6 mile day was one of those you would rather not do. Rain to start with. Seas running up to 4' with an occasional 6 footer, and 12 -17 knots of true wind just off the bow. We set the main to assist the engine in the early going to try to steady the boat. Then we reefed down to the 1st reef as the wind got to 13 knots true - feeling like 20 knots when combined with our boat speed - and then down to the 2nd reef as apparent wind got up around 23-25.

When the wind clocked a bit to the west, we had to drop the main. Since the occasional seas were coming aboard in green water, rolling down the weather side and spilling into the wheel well in the cockpit, going on deck was not a fun prospect. Steve suggested we try just dropping the main without anyone on deck and letting the Dutchman lines catch the main. Rick eased away on the halyard, and on each bounce of a wave, the main slowly came down by itself. We left it that way until we reached Portsmouth, and Wentworth Marina at 1250.

Rick discovered that the meal plan sitting on the bread shelf area of the galley was wet. At first he thought it was just from an open port, or perhaps the small cabin-top vent hatch that had been left open or dripped in the heavy seas. But when the bottoms of all the bread wrappers were wet too, there had to be something more. A persistent stream dripped down the bulkhead from the wooden channel which covered the bolts holding the jib track to the deck. Steve remarked that one of the boat yard's winter projects had been to remove the cover and re-bed the track. Apparently the heavy seas and working of the boat opened up some new leaks. They continued each time we had seas aboard, or even heavily washed the deck.

After stopping for fuel, and the comfort of a chicken chow mein lunch, Steve, Paul & Mel set to work hosing off the salt water. there were even bits of seaweed that had washed aboard with the waves to be dispatch. Brian took Rick back to his house in Rye to work on the log, upload the latest additions and do a load of laundry. Then they ran one last shopping run, returned to the house to pick up Brian's wife Lise, and returned to the boat. Dinner at Latitudes, in the marina, wrapped up the evening and we said fond farewells to Brian and gave Lise a big hug and thanks for letting Brian sail with us.

[Click to enlarge]
Wet Monday start ...
[Click to enlarge]
all working ...
[Click to enlarge]
rocks at Portsmouth.


Go To Log Summary



Tuesday, August 17th

Rain overnight further washed the deck, and even dampened the head where the port had been left open. With 57 miles planned on the run for Boston, it was a "Steve work day" departure - 0548. The usual drill: juice and a sip of coffee; get the water and electric stowed; power up the computer, radios and instruments; and cast off.

Problem was, you couldn't see where to go. The next dock was sort of there, but the boats on moorings weren't. Slowly, at 3 knots, we crept down the narrow lane between the two mooring fields, and ten minutes later, at 0558, we'd reached open water and throttled up.

Now you might think that since we were up so early, there would be no problem. True, there weren't many, if any, cruisers out there, but the Maine lobster boat fleet is out there every morning before sun up. Two things make that tricky. First, they change course often, and second they speed up and slow down frequently. So just when you think a radar target is safely moving away from you, or you are passing it, it turns toward you and speeds up. While they live by radar and GPS, they aren't used to seeing damn fool cruising boats in "their" waters at zero dark thirty either.

We droned on with the usual radar watch drill, a bit harder without Brian who lives in Rye, New Hampshire, right down the road from Wentworth Marina. We didn't see Cape Ann as we rounded her square end and turned back west for Boston between 0855 and 0922. As we passed Gloucester there were plenty of radar targets to watch, and slowly the visibility got better. A big red trawler provided a picture opportunity, as did a big ocean working lobster boat.

About 1030, and 15 miles out, we finally started seeing the building of downtown Boston. Now Boston is a great city with lots of attractions, but it sure is a stark contrast to the wilds of Cobscook Bay or Mistake Harbor. We powered up the north channel right into downtown and Steve expertly backed Javelin into a slip at Waterboat Marina. It reminded Rick & Steve of Lake Michigan racing when the fleet ties to a city dock and all the folks come by to watch -- and be watched.

It was also the first real heat of the cruise - with a 89 forecast for the high. We quickly switched on the air conditioning. Jeffrey Blecher lives in Boston with his wife Jen and their 2 kids. Jeffrey was flying back from business to join us for dinner and Steve headed to their apartment to catch up with Jen and the kids. Mel headed for his favorite coffee shop to stock up on grounds. Rick & Paul aimed for the aquarium, just one dock away, but the big crowds and long lines were so discouraging, they settled for a big dish of swirled soft ice cream. Rick, Paul and Mel returned to the air conditioning to catch up on the log, reading and to wait for the arrival of Steve, Jeffrey and Jen for cocktails, then dinner ashore.

We had a great dinner and celebrated Jeffrey's 34 birthday too - it was today! All hands back aboard a bit after nine, and slowly headed for bed --no early rising tomorrow!

[Click to enlarge]
Foggy Tuesday
[Click to enlarge]
Gloucester trawler ...
[Click to enlarge]
heading out.
[Click to enlarge]
Big lobster boat ...
[Click to enlarge]
working hard.
[Click to enlarge]
10 miles to Boston
[Click to enlarge]
North channel entrance
[Click to enlarge]
Deer Island
Filtration plant ...
[Click to enlarge]
and wind turbines.
[Click to enlarge]
President Roads Light
[Click to enlarge]
Fort Independence
[Click to enlarge]
Landing past ...
[Click to enlarge]
Logan control tower.
[Click to enlarge]
Downtown & USCG
[Click to enlarge]
Old lightship
[Click to enlarge]
Dead center ...
[Click to enlarge]
approacing marina
[Click to enlarge]
from our slip.
[Click to enlarge]
Looking good.
[Click to enlarge]
Dock entrance ...
[Click to enlarge]
front side ...
[Click to enlarge]
marina ...
[Click to enlarge]
best looking.
[Click to enlarge]
Lines were too long
[Click to enlarge]
Great afternoon.
b[Click to enlarge]
Big ships,
[Click to enlarge]
sailing ship ...
[Click to enlarge]
for tourists ...
[Click to enlarge]
cat to Provincetown ...
[Click to enlarge]
harbor tour.
[Click to enlarge]
Full of tourists ...
[Click to enlarge]
all sizes ...
[Click to enlarge]
positions ...
[Click to enlarge]
picture takers ...
[Click to enlarge]
lady on the rock ...
[Click to enlarge]
and even ...
[Click to enlarge]
snuggles.
[Click to enlarge]
So What?!
[Click to enlarge]
Here comes ...
[Click to enlarge]
Steve & Jeffrey ...
[Click to enlarge]
and Jen ...
[Click to enlarge]
welcome aboard.
[Click to enlarge]
Great evening.


Go To Log Summary

Wednesday, August 18th

Mel was starting coffee at 0703 - very civilized. Rick did a last eggs, Little Smokies and fresh biscuits breakfast. Then a bit of housecleaning to tidy up for our day of kids. It would have been nicer if the sun were shining and there was some wind, but we'll take what we get and make the best of it.

Jeffrey, Jen, Ella and Olivia Blecher arrived about 10:15. What a treat! The plan had been for Olivia, 4 months old, to be at home with a baby sitter. But sitter delays resulted in her joining her sister and each of them had their first ever Javelin sails together. We shoved the dock at 1028. There was no wind, and it was cloudy, but that didn't dampen spirits as we went out with our sun awning still set. Clear of most traffic, Steve put Jeffrey & Ella on the helm, and Ella had great fun, at 3 years old, turning the wheel. She was sharp enough to notice that grandpa Steve kept sticking his foot in the way, and she shooed him away so she could continue turning the wheel. Olivia alternated between naps in Jen's arms and occasional complaints - usually resolved with a bottle. We rolled out the jib and Ella steered faster than Steve - she did 1.4 knots, Steve did 0.9.

We returned to the dock at 1220. Rick had already started a pot of water and the sauce with meatballs for spaghetti, and a greed salad was mixed and ready. Mel's daughter Mate, plus daughter Liddy, and son Roby, arrived just after 12:30. the spaghetti went in, and before long we had Steve, Jeff, Ella, Mel, Mate, Liddy, Roby & Jen at the table, Paul at the chart table, and Rick eating in the galley. We think serving ten is a first for this crew, and Olivia doesn't yet count. We finished off lunch with the really special peaches, blueberries and strawberries that Mate brought aboard. We topped them with a dash of whipped cream and a chocolate chip cookie. All hands celebrated!

Jeffrey & Jen departed, and we set sail with Mate & crew at 1352. there was a little more wind and set set the main and tried to sail out past Logan airport. But even though 7 knots registered on the wind gauge, there was little push in it. Liddy & Roby took turns at the wheel under Mel's great guidance. Out at President Roads, we gave up and turned on the power. Rick needed to get the fridge colder anyway, and now the kids could steer and see something happen when they turned the wheel.

We retraced our way back to the head of the harbor, going even farther than the morning run. The industrial end of Boston had a big car carried docked on one side and a big scrap steel ship on the other. We circled back again around the North End, getting another glimpse of the USS Constitution, the oldest navy ship in commission. Unfortunately she was not in her glory but undergoing a major refit. There were even tall cranes working on her top hamper in the morning. I wonder what the iron men who sailed wooden ships would have thought of that way to fit a topmast! Directly across from her, with all but her steeple hidden from the water was the Old North Church, where Paul Revere was to fly, "One if by land, two if by sea."

We returned to our great slip on the north side of Long Wharf at Waterboat Marina at 1630 with another happy family. The kids got one more cookie and departed. The crew took showers and debated the rest of the day. While we thought we were waiting for Paul to come back from a shower, he was back and reading in the cockpit. To celebrate the day, we continued on our Skipper's dictum to finish off the food before we got back to Westbrook. It was tough, but we defrosted the last of the shrimp, cut up some sharp cheddar, poured a bowl of spicy cashews, added a few cheddar Goldfish, and topped that off with some wheat thins and whipped cream cheese - and called it dinner.

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Steve, Ella
Olivia & Jeffrey
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Jen too
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Welcome aboard
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Mom too!
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Hi Olivia
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Double trouble ...
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Jen clicks.
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Charles River Bridge
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USS Constitution
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Boston Garden
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Natives!
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Looks it
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Day sailors ...
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are happy.
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Samuel Clemens

Ella's First Steering Lesson




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At the helm
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Parking lot
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Welcome Roby
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Hi Mate
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Hi Liddy
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Lunch!
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Nice schooner
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Great hat
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Avoid that ...
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and that!
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Driving lessons ...
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comfort time
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1 if by land,
2 if by sea
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I got it!
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Me too.
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Old Ironsides.
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Let's go ...
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sailing.


Go To Log Summary

Thursday, August 19th

It was already 0628 when we slipped our line and backed out of Waterboat Marina as everything and everyone around was still and quiet. Oily flat water all the way out past Logan and President Roads, taking a right to depart Boston via the south channel. Minots Ledge Light, 85' high, looked like it was a submarine periscope, no land was visible at high tide.

Otto drove as the engine droned away the miles down to the Cape Cod Canal. Scituate slid past, then Plymouth. It would be interesting to know what Plymouth looked like when it was Pilgrim territory, because today it's so shallow you can't even get Javelin into the harbor. Further, the approach is littered with sand bars and flats leaving few if any landmarks to use to guide a ship safely in.

A quick 14 minute stop at Sandwich filled the port fuel tank with 26.4 gallons of diesel, then we pushed on into the canal against a building flood. From our cruising speed of 8.0 knots, we saw speed decrease to 7.4, then 6.5, then 5.9, then 4.7 and finally 4.2 before we emerged at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

We later complimented Jay & Hasty for their efforts to make us feel welcome at Scraggy Neck. At 1410, coming down the Cape Cod Canal channel abeam Great Neck, a low-flying 747 approached from the west. It dipped it's wings as it passed overhead (just kidding), as Air Force 1 with President Obama aboard was making it's landing approach to Ottis Air Force Base. The Obamas were headed for a weekend at Martha's Vineyard.

We picked up our own stars, Jay & Hasty Evans, in front of their house on Scraggy Neck 30 minutes later. With a fun 12 knot wind, we sailed the upper reaches of Buzzards Bay. Jay had an uncanny knack for aiming Javelin at every rock in the area. Steve & Rick kept him honest and called for tacks when we were a minute or two away.

We were back at Scraggy with the anchor down at 1656. We piled the making for a pork chop dinner into a bag and sent it ashore with Jay & Hasty. The crew cleaned up and followed shortly. Jay & Hasty's friends Mike & Betsy Millard joined us, and we had a range of nibbles and beverages on the deck in perfect weather. Rick uploaded another Log update, then was assigned to cook the chops on the grill while Hasty perfected broiled veggies and corn on the cob. We ate on the deck, and finished off with a wonderful dessert of scones topped with a strawberry & blueberry mix topped with whipped cream.

Steve led the crew off into the dark, flashlight in hand, when it was time to head back to Javelin. The rubber dinghy made two trips from a neighbor's float to the boat in short order, and we rolled into our bunks before ten.

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Boston departure.
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Breakfast of Champions
thanks, Mate
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Minots Ledge Light
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4.2 knots in Canal
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12 Meter ...
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flies past.
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Scuba lessons ...
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on the Kennedy
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Big fish
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At Scraggy Neck ...
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from Jay & Hasty's
front porch ...
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crew is relaxed ...
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Jay & Hasty + Mike


Go To Log Summary

Friday, August 20th

Bob Dylan got it right. "... When the rooster crows at the break of dawn, Look out your window, and, I'll be gone ..." And gone we were, exactly one hour, and eight miles out along the route home to Westbrook, when we saw the sun break above the low clouds at 0609.

Though northwesterlies, and even north winds, were predicted for later in the day, our initial breeze was a right-on-the-nose westerly. Javelin, with Otto's help, churned steadily west, shouldering the small seas as we worked our way out of Buzzards Bay. It was 6 minutes before eight when we entered Rhode Island Sound and aimed for Point Judith.

Brian suggested we tally up the number of meals served on the cruise. Here's the count:

Meal Type For For For For For For Total Total
# of Eaters 4 5 6 7 8 10 by type Servings
                 
Breakfasts: 6 12         18 84
                 
Lunches 5 13       1 19 95
                 
Dinners 2 6   2 1   11 60
                 
Totals: 13 31   2 1 1 48 239


The wind came and went. Ever eager to sail, we hoisted sail at 1108 with 10 knots of wind and promptly out-sailed the engine, making 8.4 knots. Twenty-two minutes later we rolled up the jib and turned on the engine as the wind dropped to 6. Off and on the wind would tease us, but, with a total run of 11 or twelve hours, we kept the engine humming.

Last day chores passed easily. The bunks were stripped. Duffel bags repacked. The emergency "ditch bag" was unpacked. Magazines sorted into leaving, staying and getting tossed.

Again the northwest wind tried to fill in. Again we rolled out the jib and proceeded under sail coming out of Fishers Island Sound. At times we were doing 8; at times only 6. Farther offshore we could see boats sailing on a southwest wind - an a good one at that. The two winds fought, and we were in the middle. In came the jib, and back to engine and main. Finally, inside Long Sand Shoal, we surrendered and dropped the main.

We took our time and did a careful job of furling the main neatly along the dutchman lines. Then on went the sail cover for the first time in three weeks. Winch handles were stowed, and the two spinnaker and spare jib halyards taken forward so they would not slap against the mast. The cockpit cushions, that are also life preservers, were stowed back aft, and the two folding seats went below to their resting place in the pilot berth.

We throttled back in the Westbrook entrance channel to stop at the fuel dock at 1647, 20 minutes short of a 12 hour run. Fuel tank filled, it was a short move to Javelin's slip. Time to deflate the new dinghy and pack it up, hose off the whole boat, and empty the fridge and freezer of the few remaining items. Finally a once over with the vacuum. Three cart-loads of duffel bags, computers and gear made it to the car and got loaded.

We adjourned to the Boom restaurant for a quick burger dinner - where we sat and discussed options for next year's cruise.

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Here comes ...
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the sun.
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Making tracks.
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Time to go ...
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Thank you Javelin.


Go To Log Summary

Clear Sailing.

Rick Van Mell vanmells@ix.netcom.com




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